Would you donate blood with this iron level?

Bennytrt

New Member
Hello everyone,

Let me get straight to the point. My doctor wants me to donate blood because he says my hematocrit has been high for the past 3 blood tests. He says he wants me back to the normal range or the medical board is going to be like what is going on with this patient of yours that has not brought down his hematocrit. I previously told him my hematocrit is not high because people who live in higher elevations have hematocrit levels way higher than the normal range and they are perfectly fine. I know this based on study that I read on here. I cannot find the link to prove my statement but if anyone can find it, please feel free to attach it.

My main concern is that I do not want to drop my iron levels too low and feel like crap. Like my title says would you donate blood with my current iron level?

Side note: I was going to donate blood back in December 2019 but when the blood bank check my hematocrit it was at 47% so I said no thanks. I had already drank 1 gallon of water when they tested my hematocrit.

Here are my past 3 hematocrit results:

7.02.2020 Labcorp (I drank 2.5 liters of water before the tests)
Hemoglobin: 17 g/dl (13-17.7)
Hematocrit: 52% (37.5-51)
Iron Bind. Cap (TIBC): 269 ug/dl (250-450)
UIBC: 182 ug/dl (111-343)
Iron: 87 ug/dl (38-169)
Iron Saturation: 32% (15-55)
Ferritin: 198 ng/ml (30-400)

3.13.2020 Labcorp (I drank 2 liters of water before the tests)
Hemoglobin: 17.2 g/dl (13-77)
Hematocrit: 51.5% (37.5-51)
Iron Bind. Cap (TIBC): 274 ug/dl (250-450)
UIBC: 180 ug/dl (111-343)
Iron: 94 ug/dl (38-169)
Iron Saturation: 34% (15-55)
Ferritin: 187 ng/ml (30-400)

12.11.2019 Labcorp (I drank 1.5 liters of water before the tests)
Hemoglobin: 17.2 g/dl (13-77)
Hematocrit: 51% (37.5-51)
Iron Bind. Cap (TIBC): 246 ug/dl (250-450)
UIBC: 141 ug/dl (111-343)
Iron: 105 ug/dl (38-169)
Iron Saturation: 43% (15-55)
Ferritin: 224 ng/ml (30-400)
 

Bennytrt

New Member
Whats your protocol and complete testosterone panel
I inject 0.10cc's of testosterone cypionate IM daily and 500IU's HCG 2x a week. I split my hcg dose in 4 sessions to keep my estradiol sensitve lower. I did my blood work the day of my injection and injected after my blood test. I do not take an AI. I drink 1.5 gallons to 2.5 gallons of water on a daily basis. I work out in my garage and it's pretty darn hot over here in houston,tx.

Labcorp
total testosterone: 1005 ng/dl (264-916)
free testotsterone: 30.1 pg/ml (8.7-25.1)
estradiol sensitive: 32.3 pg/ml (8.0-35)
shbg: 23 nmol/l (16.5-55.9)
albumin: 4.5 g/dl (4.0-5.0)
DHT: 70ng/dl (30-85)
Dhea S: 197ng/dl (31-701)
growth hormone 0.1 ng/ml (0.0-10)
homocysteine 4.8 umol/l (0.0-14.5)
CRP-Quantative 7 mg/l (0-10)
 

Vince

Super Moderator
Actually as you probably know HCT of 52% is not really that high. Hopefully after two years or more your hct will stabilize even lower.
 

Joe Sixpack

Active Member
Your ferritin is plenty high. There are some health providers who focus on longevity who recommend ferritin to be under 80. The theory is that ferritin is an oxidizer in the body. And you do not want too much of it. Of course you do need a minimum amount for energy production. I've had mine down below 50 and felt fine.
 

Bennytrt

New Member
Actually as you probably know HCT of 52% is not really that high. Hopefully after two years or more your hct will stabilize even lower.
Correct, a HCT of 52% is not high. I have been on HRT for 6 years. Out of those 6 years, I have been 3 years on the above protocol. I usually stay between a HCT of 51 to 52%. I will try the grapefruit diet and see what happens. Do you know by any chance, how much would my iron drop? If I decide to donate? I have looked online at a conversion chart, but no luck. All I found... was that you lose 220 to 250 mg of iron per unit of blood. However, my iron is in UG/DL.
 

Bennytrt

New Member
Your ferritin is plenty high. There are some health providers who focus on longevity who recommend ferritin to be under 80. The theory is that ferritin is an oxidizer in the body. And you do not want too much of it. Of course you do need a minimum amount for energy production. I've had mine down below 50 and felt fine.
I have read that on study and was considering to donate. I also found on the stop the tyroid madness website that the optimal level for men is 110 ish.
 

Vince

Super Moderator
Correct, a HCT of 52% is not high. I have been on HRT for 6 years. Out of those 6 years, I have been 3 years on the above protocol. I usually stay between a HCT of 51 to 52%. I will try the grapefruit diet and see what happens. Do you know by any chance, how much would my iron drop? If I decide to donate? I have looked online at a conversion chart, but no luck. All I found... was that you lose 220 to 250 mg of iron per unit of blood. However, my iron is in UG/DL.
Approximately 14 million units of whole blood are collected annually by blood centers throughout the United States. As a result, approximately 3.5 tons of iron is removed from whole-blood donors each year. This loss of iron is evident in the decrease in the iron stores as mea- sured by serum ferritin that is associated with whole blood donation.12 Garry and coworkers2 demonstrated that serum ferritin concentration decreases steadily through five blood donations and then stabilizes at a mean concentration of approximately 20 ng per mL. During the course of these donations, it appears that daily iron absorption gradually increases to the point that the donor’s iron needs are met without further depletion of stores. However, there is individual variation in the ability to absorb dietary iron, and many frequent donors are deferred for low Hct. Superdonors are a self-selected population able to repeatedly donate whole blood without being deferred for low Hct despite having depleted iron stores, indicating that they have higher than expected absorption of dietary iron."

 

Vince

Super Moderator
Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world’s population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of cardiovascular medicine. Data indicate that iron deficiency has detrimental effects in patients with coronary artery disease, heart failure (HF), and pulmonary hypertension, and possibly in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Around one-third of all patients with HF, and more than one-half of patients with pulmonary hypertension, are affected by iron deficiency. Patients with HF and iron deficiency have shown symptomatic improvements from intravenous iron administration, and some evidence suggests that these improvements occur irrespective of the presence of anaemia. Improved exercise capacity has been demonstrated after iron administration in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease - PubMed

Conclusions of https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1161/ATVBAHA.117.309757 —This Mendelian randomization study supports the hypothesis that higher iron status reduces CAD risk. These findings may highlight a therapeutic target
 

Bennytrt

New Member
Approximately 14 million units of whole blood are collected annually by blood centers throughout the United States. As a result, approximately 3.5 tons of iron is removed from whole-blood donors each year. This loss of iron is evident in the decrease in the iron stores as mea- sured by serum ferritin that is associated with whole blood donation.12 Garry and coworkers2 demonstrated that serum ferritin concentration decreases steadily through five blood donations and then stabilizes at a mean concentration of approximately 20 ng per mL. During the course of these donations, it appears that daily iron absorption gradually increases to the point that the donor’s iron needs are met without further depletion of stores. However, there is individual variation in the ability to absorb dietary iron, and many frequent donors are deferred for low Hct. Superdonors are a self-selected population able to repeatedly donate whole blood without being deferred for low Hct despite having depleted iron stores, indicating that they have higher than expected absorption of dietary iron."

Thank you, for your great feedback. I will read all of these throughout the week.
 
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