Creatine: Everything You Need To Know

#22
How would I know what's in a "scoop"? Follow dosing recs in the OP, 3-5g per day. Take that dose every day, and per above, timing does not appear to matter.
A scoop is 1gram. I will bump to 3 grams then. I currently take the HCL vs Monohydrate because I hear the Monohydrate is harder on the gut.
 
Thread starter #23
Actually a doctor told me they're not separated. The reason I really ask doctors was because every time I took creatine my creatinine levels went way over range.
News to me, but I'd have to look further into that one. We do know, in some, per above, it raises creatinine.
 
#25
1g? You sure? That would be a tiny scoop. Gut issues of CM are addressed in the OP and easy to fix. I have also added HCL to the graveyard recently...
Do you think HCL should be in the graveyard or the undecided column. I consider you the expert so I ask, what is the basis for saying it should not be used? Cost? or some study that shows it is not effective. The only study I located was out of Brazil (the hot bed of medical and scientific breakthroughs) that showed equal results. Thanks.

This is the study. Someone smarter than me can tell if this study is rubbish.
https://file.scirp.org/pdf/FNS_2015122815333061.pdf
 
Thread starter #26
Do you think HCL should be in the graveyard or the undecided column. I consider you the expert so I ask, what is the basis for saying it should not be used? Cost? or some study that shows it is not effective. The only study I located was out of Brazil (the hot bed of medical and scientific breakthroughs) that showed equal results. Thanks.

This is the study. Someone smarter than me can tell if this study is rubbish.
https://file.scirp.org/pdf/FNS_2015122815333061.pdf
Not taken seriously by those in the supp research community for a variety of reasons. If it has equal results to CM, and CM considerably less $ and far better researched, then logic dictates it makes sense to use CM. Section #1 of article explains why HCL is in the graveyard. Of all the alternative forms of creatine sold to CM, HCL probably the most promising, but the fact producers and sellers are making hand over fist $ from it, yet don't put jack shit $ into doing any research to support it, is very telling to me. I suspect what they will find is, it's at best, equal in effects to CM, so it comes back to cost, and CM wins again on that front and the pre dissolving in a hot liquid solves the other issues.

HCL is not a scam like other forms of creatine are/were per se, it's just no better and more $, but the total lack of comparative data is the real issue

Hence it sits in the graveyard...
 
Thread starter #29
I don't know really which is one is better as I've only taken the HCL one but there seems to be different opinions on this. Monohydrate has been more researched but apparently you get 60 % more from HCL since it draws more water from the gut.
Pseudoscience BS. Opinions are like..well, you know. Published data is where the BS meets reality, anything else WAG to sell product. Not one iota of hard data to support any major claims of CM vs HCL. CM has no profit margins, hence the search for new magical forms that are superior...

BTW, everything he's saying in that vid was nicely disproved by that other "wonder" form of creatine everyone was convinced would be superior to CM, which was CEE. That all went to chit once it was actually tested per the graveyard article and what prompted me to put that together. Kre alk, same deal...

It's your $, I just bring the facts.
 
#30
I like the Kre-Alk which is a lower amount of creatine combined with baking soda more or less. Baking soda has its own benefits per studies. At any rate it seems to work as well for me as taking larger amounts of powders which often upset my stomach.
 
#31
Pseudoscience BS. Opinions are like..well, you know. Published data is where the BS meets reality, anything else WAG to sell product. Not one iota of hard data to support any major claims of CM vs HCL. CM has no profit margins, hence the search for new magical forms that are superior...

BTW, everything he's saying in that vid was nicely disproved by that other "wonder" form of creatine everyone was convinced would be superior to CM, which was CEE. That all went to chit once it was actually tested per the graveyard article and what prompted me to put that together. Kre alk, same deal...

It's your $, I just bring the facts.
Then it will be Monohydrate for me next time once I finish the HCL.
 
Thread starter #32
I like the Kre-Alk which is a lower amount of creatine combined with baking soda more or less. Baking soda has its own benefits per studies. At any rate it seems to work as well for me as taking larger amounts of powders which often upset my stomach.
It's a rip off per the claims made by sellers, and as with all the others to date like CEE, Serum, etc, crashed and burned once legit comparative studies done:

http://www.brinkzone.com/supplement-science/the-creatine-graveyard-update-2012/

Convincing people to paying that much for CM and soda ash is what keeps sellers laughing all the way to the bank at our/your expense.
 
Thread starter #37
An excellent review on the benefits to the brain:

Beyond muscle: the effects of creatine supplementation on brain creatine, cognitive processing, and traumatic brain injury

Abstract

The ergogenic and therapeutic effects of increasing muscle creatine by supplementation are well-recognized. It appears that similar benefits to brain function and cognitive processing may also be achieved with creatine supplementation, however research in this area is more limited, and important knowledge gaps remain. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of knowledge about the influence of creatine supplementation on brain function in healthy individuals. It appears that brain creatine is responsive to supplementation, however higher, or more prolonged dosing strategies than those typically used to increase muscle creatine, may be required to elicit an increase in brain creatine. The optimal dosing strategy to induce this response, is currently unknown, and there is an urgent need for studies investigating this. When considering the influence of supplementation strategies on cognitive processes, it appears that creatine is most likely to exert an influence in situations whereby cognitive processes are stressed, e.g. during sleep deprivation, experimental hypoxia, or during the performance of more complex, and thus more cognitively demanding tasks. Evidence exists indicating that increased brain creatine may be effective at reducing the severity of, or enhancing recovery from mild traumatic brain injury, however, only limited data in humans are available to verify this hypothesis, thus representing an exciting area for further research.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17461391.2018.1500644
 
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Thread starter #38
Studies suggest creatine may be helpful with depression and various mood disorders as well as being neuroprotective. Here's a new review worth a read:

The possible beneficial effects of creatine for the management of depression

Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry 2018 September 4

Depression, a highly prevalent neuropsychiatric disorder worldwide, causes a heavy burden for the society and is associated with suicide risk. The treatment of this disorder remains a challenge, since currently available antidepressants provide a slow and, often, incomplete response and cause several side effects that contribute to diminish the adhesion of patients to treatment. In this context, several nutraceuticals have been investigated regarding their possible beneficial effects for the management of this neuropsychiatric disorder.

Creatine stands out as a supplement frequently used for ergogenic purpose, but it also is a neuroprotective compound with potential to treat or mitigate a broad range of central nervous systems diseases, including depression. This review presents preclinical and clinical evidence that creatine may exhibit antidepressant properties. The focus is given on the possible molecular mechanisms underlying its effects based on the results obtained with different animal models of depression.

Finally, evidence obtained in animal models of depression addressing the possibility that creatine may produce rapid antidepressant effect, similar to ketamine, are also presented and discussed.

Full paper:

http://sci-hub.tw/10.1016/j.pnpbp.2018.08.029
 
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