The "old guy" workout :)

#21
That depends on loading, time of the push, goals, etc. Max push for short distance will have different effects than moderate loads for longer distances and short rest periods. If you're trying to HIIT, a load that's close to max effort for 20-30s seconds of pushing, followed by 1m rest, should be in the ball park. What distance choices do you have?
I’ve not actually measured the distance, but I’d estimate it at about 50 feet.
 
#23
I used to lift competitively in high school and college, now at 52 I have no desire to slug heavy weights around. My routine consists of dumbbells, and barbells – mostly complex movements such as deadlifts, front squats, bent over rows, overhead press – are the core of my program. I’ve recently begun incorporating farmers carries on my lifting days and this has done absolutely wonders for my shoulder strength, trap size, and scapular stability. I lift 4 days per week, hitting each body part twice, and I’m done in 30-40 minutes. No cardio other than casual bike rides or now, doing 1 or 2 rounds of the 7 minute workout app when I feel like it.
As we age, resistance training becomes more important than cardio IMO. A lot of cardiac health is inherited and other risks can be mediated through statins if it becomes a problem – but old age muscle wasting is a real disease – and a real problem so it’s good that we keep up the strength training as we age.
 
Thread starter #24
I’ve not actually measured the distance, but I’d estimate it at about 50 feet.
If HIIT, weight you can just make the distance in 20-30 seconds, 1min rest. For endurance work, strength development, etc, could be different, such as longer or shorter rest periods and such. Cant go wrong with sled work.
 
#25
If HIIT, weight you can just make the distance in 20-30 seconds, 1min rest. For endurance work, strength development, etc, could be different, such as longer or shorter rest periods and such. Cant go wrong with sled work.
I have a leg weakness issue. I won’t bore you with the details. So if I decide to try the sled it would be more for strength than HIIT.
 
#26
Curious what everyone's thoughts are on high intensity training. There's a lot of research coming out that what matters most is intensity of effort rather than load. Ie training to failure with 50%,75%, or 90% of 1RM all achieve the same thing for the most part. Additionally the research is showing that strength training to failure shows a lot of similar adaptations to pure cardio. Finally, if you rush between sets you'll get a metabolic workout as well.

Also for those looking for a joint friendly workout Drew Baye has a high intensity program called project Kratos that's all bodyweight and timed static contractions that use different mechanically disadvantaged positions to continually escalate the resistance up.
 
#27
I have much better workouts when I shorten the rest time and increase my reps. With that being said I also have to increase the weight as I grow and get stronger. When I tell people I do high rep sets and they look at me they often call bullshit..... Until I tell them I am doing 315 on bench for 25 reps...

I still love getting stronger so I always pyramid as well down to 4 reps or so just to see how much stronger I am getting... Anything below 4 reps for me just seems dangerous for very little reward..
 
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