How much protein do you need to gain muscle?

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
What if you want to gain muscle?

Wilson & Wilson (2006) conducted an extensive review of the literature on protein intake and nitrogen balance. That review suggests that a protein intake beyond 25 percent of what is necessary to achieve a nitrogen balance of zero would have no effect on muscle gain. That would be 69 g/d for a person weighing 100 lbs (45 kg); 105 g/d for a person weighing 155 lbs (70 kg); and 136 g/d for someone weighing 200 lbs (91 kg). For the reasons explained above, these are also overestimations.


protein intake.png

What if you go well beyond these numbers?

The excess protein will be used primarily as fuel; that is, it will be oxidized. In fact, a large proportion of all the protein consumed on a daily basis is used as fuel, and does not become muscle. This happens even if you are a gifted bodybuilder that can add 1 lb of protein to muscle tissue per month. So excess protein can make you gain body fat, but not by protein becoming body fat.

How much protein does one need to be in nitrogen balance?
 
" Dietary protein does not normally become body fat, but will typically be used in place of dietary fat as fuel. This will allow dietary fat to be stored. Dietary protein also leads to an insulin response, which causes less body fat to be released. In this sense, protein has a fat-sparing effect, preventing it from being used to supply the energy needs of the body. As long as it is available, dietary protein will be favored over dietary or body fat as a fuel source.

Having said that, if you were to overeat anything, the best choice would be protein, in the absence of any disease that would be aggravated by this. Why? Protein contributes fewer calories per gram than carbohydrates; many fewer when compared with dietary fat. Unlike carbohydrates or fat, protein almost never becomes body fat under normal circumstances. Dietary fat is very easily converted to body fat; and carbohydrates become body fat when glycogen stores are full. Finally, protein seems to be the most satiating of all macronutrients, perhaps because natural protein-rich foods are also very nutrient-dense.

It is not very easy to eat a lot of protein without getting also a lot of fat if you get your protein from natural foods; as opposed to things like refined seed/grain products or protein supplements. Exceptions are organ meats and seafood, which generally tend to be quite lean and protein-rich. "

References

Brooks, G.A., Fahey, T.D., & Baldwin, K.M. (2005). Exercise physiology: Human bioenergetics and its applications. Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill.


Nelson:

This is part of the referenced information on protein and I was not able to understand due to the conversion to k g ? I have read in more simple terms that a gram of protein a day per every lb of lean body weight est. 80% of your total weight and that protein could be ingested as a good to go food since the body could only absorb 30 grams of per hr . If this is true a man weighing 230 lbs and of medium to lean statute would ingest 175 grams of protein through out the day ? Would you say the is a fair conversion stated a little bit different way ? Please assist me in understanding my question as this is how I plan my daily Macros ? In addition chewable protein is the best protein and pure whey is not a substitute for chewsble protein ?
 

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
Protein has the same number of calories as carbohydrates. Depending on the person and what else is consumed with it, it may raise insulin less than consuming simple crabs.

 

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
My buddy Jerry Brainum answers several questions in this video ( do not click away when he finishes each answer). He has a few of these videos on youtube.


 
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GEORGE TOULIATOS

New Member
Protein serves as a basic component of several different tissues (muscle,connective ).It is also basic substrate of hormones,peptides,immuloglobulins.It has a thermogenic effect on metabolism,as 25% of their calories are burned for their digestion.
 

Marni Moon

New Member
it's not just the amount of protein that matters. and how it is absorbed. I would recommend taking additionally betaine (if there is a lot of protein or you have some problem) or taking sour sauces (lemon juice, apple cider vinegar)
 

Fernando Almaguer

Active Member
Protein serves as a basic component of several different tissues (muscle,connective ).It is also basic substrate of hormones,peptides,immuloglobulins.It has a thermogenic effect on metabolism,as 25% of their calories are burned for their digestion.
There was also a study done on when protein should be consumed for maximum growth of muscle and also maintenance of muscle. I think it was between early am hours. It mentioned our cells have clocks for protein synthesis in the genes.
 

Bigben

New Member
Really great information here. I changed off regular protein powders to eaa. Made a huge difference. Never any bloat anymore. You feel swole about a half hour after you take them. Add a bit of old school maltodextrin and boom!
 

Bigben

New Member
Also, and I think this applies to many. Most protein powders I have used go right thru me or bung me up. So the amount I took made little difference. Of course good diet helps. But I am poor so eating high protein food is not easy.
 

Bigben

New Member
What if you want to gain muscle?

Wilson & Wilson (2006) conducted an extensive review of the literature on protein intake and nitrogen balance. That review suggests that a protein intake beyond 25 percent of what is necessary to achieve a nitrogen balance of zero would have no effect on muscle gain. That would be 69 g/d for a person weighing 100 lbs (45 kg); 105 g/d for a person weighing 155 lbs (70 kg); and 136 g/d for someone weighing 200 lbs (91 kg). For the reasons explained above, these are also overestimations.


View attachment 1485

What if you go well beyond these numbers?

The excess protein will be used primarily as fuel; that is, it will be oxidized. In fact, a large proportion of all the protein consumed on a daily basis is used as fuel, and does not become muscle. This happens even if you are a gifted bodybuilder that can add 1 lb of protein to muscle tissue per month. So excess protein can make you gain body fat, but not by protein becoming body fat.

How much protein does one need to be in nitrogen balance?
Nelson your a brainiac! This post will save alot of people alot of money to
 

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