Hematocrit 57.5

Thread starter #1
3 weeks ago my Hematocrit came back at 57.5. I donated blood immediately and just drew lab again last week and I was at 53.2 normal range is 40 - 54 for this particular lab.
RBC 5.7
HGB 16
Two months prior in March my HCT was 55 and I then donated blood..
Im concerned because I can't donate again until late June and by then I will probably be back at 57.
My doctor doesn't seem worried though.
My current regimen is 100mg test cyp divided in two doses weekly and 500 units HCG divided into 2 doses.
Total T is 850 trough
Free T 21
My hematocrit always ran high, but donating every 6 months seemed to control it. Since adding HCG 2 months ago it seems to be getting out of control.
Any ideas?
 
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#2
3 weeks ago my Hematocrit came back at 57.5. I donated blood immediately and just drew lab again last week and I was at 53.2 normal range is 40 - 54 for this particular lab.
RBC 5.7
HGB 16
Two months prior in March my HCT was 55 and I then donated blood..
Im concerned because I can't donate again until late June and by then I will probably be back at 57.
My doctor doesn't seem worried though.
My current regimen is 100mg test cyp divided in two doses weekly and 500 units HCG divided into 2 doses.
Total T is 850 trough
Free T 21
My hematocrit always ran high, but donating every 6 months seemed to control it. Since adding HCG 2 months ago it seems to be getting out of control.
Any ideas?
If you are confident HCG is the culprit maybe try to reduce the dosage. What’s the reason for adding HCG? Fertility? You are taking 250IU 2x a week? If yes that is already a very low dosage. Do you take testosterone and HCG together (at the same time)?
 
Thread starter #3
If you are confident HCG is the culprit maybe try to reduce the dosage. What’s the reason for adding HCG? Fertility? You are taking 250IU 2x a week? If yes that is already a very low dosage. Do you take testosterone and HCG together (at the same time)?
Yes 250 units twice a week. I added the HCG for testicular shrinkage. I inject same day as I inject T
 
#4
Yes 250 units twice a week. I added the HCG for testicular shrinkage. I inject same day as I inject T
In that case that are not many options. Your body might adjust to HCG with time having a lesser impact in your HCT but no guarantees. One options would be to reduce your testosterone dosage. Do you have labs before and after adding HCG? Depending if you are primary or secondary the addition of HCG will cause your testosterone levels to increase so you can reduce your testosterone dosage and achieve the same testosterone levels and hopefully that would help with you HCT.
I am currently experimenting with IP6 (an iron chelator). Once i get bloodwork work done i will post here
 
#5
Remember that hydration is a huge player in HCT, a few points swing either way is possible. I'd look more to your level of Platelets and reconsider the fact that the misdiagnosed PCV is actually a very benign erythrocitosis (google it) its been discussed here.
 
Thread starter #7
So on Friday I went to my family doctor for an unrelated issue and had bloods drawn. Hematocrit 49.5
Not sure why such a big difference from one lab to the next.
AST was 75
On Tuesdays labs AST was 21
Crazy
 
#10
Remember that hydration is a huge player in HCT, a few points swing either way is possible. I'd look more to your level of Platelets and reconsider the fact that the misdiagnosed PCV is actually a very benign erythrocitosis (google it) its been discussed here.
Careful with that line of thinking Vince. You’re swinging the pendulum too far in the opposite direction from the practitioners and lay public whom mistakenly equate elevated HCT (erythrocytosis) to polycythemia vera. True increase in HCT is not polycythemia vera and should never be mistaken for same (with the latter carrying more risk, primarily due to the elevated platelets that you appropriately mention). However, one cannot extend that logic to the far extreme and make the conclusion (leap) that erythrocytosis itself (especially iatrogenic and not physiologic) is without risk. @Nelson Vergel has posted a substantial amount of data (which is still only a portion of the data that exists) showing the flaws in that logic. Here’s a hint, which I’ve said many times previously, it’s not blood clotting we’re concerned about with elevated HCT (THAT is indeed platelets and/or clotting factors)...it is the other direct and indirect effects of the increased viscosity of the blood — blood pressure, shear forces on arterial walls over many years, etc.
 
#11
@Dr Justin Saya MD
Hi, Dr, I know that you have not adopted what some of your colleagues have put forth in this area specifically, HCT, Erythrocytosis(sp), and all of that related subject matter.
Men deserve to hear a different theory that they can decide for themselves and discuss with their provider.
In the end I donate because you require me to do so and I value the treatment that you provide to me and I wish to be compliant with your requirements.
 
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#12
@Dr Justin Saya MD
Hi, Dr, I know that you have not adopted what some of your colleagues have put forth in this area specifically, HCT, Erythrocytosis(sp), and all of that related subject matter.
Men deserve to hear a different theory that they can decide for themselves and discuss with their provider.
In the end I donate because you require me to do so and I value the treatment that you provide to me and I wish to be compliant with your requirements.
I understand Vince.

I just want to make sure that although the distinction between erythrocytosis and polycythemia vera is a real one (and a significant one), that those focusing on that one debate point don’t lose sight of the forest for the trees and extrapolate to assume that erythrocytosis itself is without risk.
 
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