Do OTC vitamin/mineral/herbal supplements have a significant impact on meaningful labs?

Craig74

New Member
Do OTC vitamin/mineral/herbal supplements have a significant impact on meaningful labs (free T, SHBG, E2)? Or do they only have a minor impact? I ask because I take a lot of supplements and wonder if I'm potentially doing things that are counter-productive or if I'm wasting my money because their impact is minor.

Here is a list of supplements I regularly take:

Calcium D-Glucarate - 500mg most days
Red Maca - 500mg every other day
Boron - 3mg daily
Magnesium - 500 mg daily
Zinc - 25mg daily
Vitamin D - 4000IU daily (with some K)
Iodine - 750 mcg daily
D-aspartic acid - 3g most days
DIM - 100mg most days
Melatonin - 5mg nightly

Supplements I periodically take:

Broad spectrum vitamin E - 300mg
Multi-B
Astaxanthin - 3mg
Coenzyme Q10 - rarely
Super prostate formula - 1x per week
Lycopene - 1x per week
Vitamin C
Olive leaf
Resveratrol

I eat arugula and drink a "greens" and "phytoberry" drink daily.
 

Systemlord

Member
The only supplement I know of that affects laboratory testing is biotin.

If you don't have a deficiency and are taking for example vitamin D and C, that is not really necessary. All you really need (aside from deficiencies) is a balanced diet that includes everything your body needs.

A lot of people who take supplements don't really need it and when there is a deficiency, something is missing from their diet.
 
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Craig74

New Member
The only supplement I know of that affects laboratory testing is biotin.

If you don't have a deficiency and are taking for example vitamin D and C, that is not really necessary. All you really need (aside from deficiencies) is a balanced diet that includes everything your body needs.

A lot of people who take supplements don't really need it and when there is a deficiency, something is missing from their diet.
To clarify. I didn't mean affect labs in terms of giving misleading or false results which is what biotin can do. I meant can supplements actually materially change the actual values (i.e. amount you have in your body).
 

Guided_by_Voices

Active Member
I think the answer you're looking for is a a resounding YES! Assuming, that is, that they're being absorbed properly, the dosage you're taking, the form and co-factors, and whether you're testing blood value or cellular values, etc. Others not on your list like DHEA and berberine will also affect lab values.
 

KarennJames

New Member
Hi, bro. I was also concerned about this question. I was advised to use kratom as a sedative. Because I often suffered from a depressive disorder. My therapist approved of this, as he noticed an improvement in my condition. When my family began to worry that kratom would negatively affect my health, I took tests. The tests were acceptable, so I calmly continued to use kratom Kratom Powder for Sale - Buy Kratom Powder Online | Amazing Botanicals. The main thing is that you know the dosage measure. It depends on the purpose for which you are using it—someone just wants to feel euphoric. My dosage was focused on the sedative effect. In my depression, I could show aggressive behavior.
 
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