1. #121
    Super Moderator Nelson Vergel's Avatar
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    Latest study shows fewer DVT events in men on TRT vs not on TRT:


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  3. #122
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    Two blood tests are commonly used to measure a dog's ability to clot: prothrombin time, or PT, and activated partial thromboplastin time, or aPTT. These tests have an established normal reference range. Animals with results that are longer than normal are considered at risk of abnormal bleeding. However, when a clotting time was shorter than normal, clinicians have typically dismissed it.
    "In the past," Silverstein said, "we've always said, no, it's probably that you pulled the sample incorrectly or the handling of the sample was inappropriate, even though logically you would think that a shorter time might indicate the animal is hypercoagulable.
    "This study was attempting to say, can we actually use a shortened prothombin time or activated partial thromboplastin time to identify patients with hypercoagulability," she added.

    http://m.phys.org/news/2016-05-animals-blood-clots.html

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    Testosterone treatment and risk of venous thromboembolism: population based case-control study

    This study showed increased risk in first 6 months only. It makes sense since it takes that long for the body to adjust to higher hematocrit and estradiol.
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  5. #124
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    From a pharma company.


    Association between Use of Exogenous Testosterone Therapy and Risk of Venous Thrombotic Events among Exogenous Testosterone Treated and Untreated Men with Hypogonadism.



    Li H, et al. J Urol. 2016.
    Authors
    Li H1, Benoit K2, Wang W2, Motsko S2.
    Author information
    1Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Co., Indianapolis, Indiana. Electronic address: LI_HU_HL@lilly.com.
    2Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Co., Indianapolis, Indiana.

    Citation
    J Urol. 2016 Apr;195(4 Pt 1):1065-72. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2015.10.134. Epub 2015 Oct 31.

    Abstract

    PURPOSE: Limited information exists about whether exogenous testosterone therapy is associated with a risk of venous thrombotic events. We investigated via cohort and nested case-control analyses whether exogenous testosterone therapy is associated with the risk of venous thrombotic events in men with hypogonadism.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Databases were reviewed to identify men prescribed exogenous testosterone therapy and/or men with a hypogonadism diagnosis. Propensity score 1:1 matching was used to select patients for cohort analysis. Cases (men with venous thrombotic events) were matched 1:4 with controls (men without venous thrombotic events) for the nested case-control analysis. Primary outcome was defined as incident idiopathic venous thrombotic events. Cox regression and conditional logistic regression were used to assess HRs and ORs, respectively. Sensitivity analyses were also performed.

    RESULTS: A total of 102,650 exogenous testosterone treated and 102,650 untreated patients were included in cohort analysis after matching, and 2,785 cases and 11,119 controls were included in case-control analysis. Cohort analysis revealed a HR of 1.08 for all testosterone treated patients (95% CI 0.91, 1.27, p = 0.378). Case-control analysis resulted in an OR of 1.02 (95% CI 0.92, 1.13, p = 0.702) for current exogenous testosterone therapy exposure and an OR of 0.92 (95% CI 0.82, 1.03, p = 0.145) for past exogenous testosterone therapy exposure. These results remained nonstatistically significant after stratifying by exogenous testosterone therapy administration route and age category. Most sensitivity analyses yielded consistent results.

    CONCLUSIONS: No significant association was found between exogenous testosterone therapy and incidents of idiopathic or overall venous thrombotic events in men with hypogonadism. However, some discrepant findings exist for the association between injectable formulations and the risk of overall venous thrombotic events.

  6. #125
    Is that stratified by dose? My concern with these huge studies is whether the stats are being twisted by people getting tiny doses from gel/cream?

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