Higher IGF-1 Predicted Higher Mortality

DS3

Active Member
Interesting study !

Crazy how this study demonstrates that higher IGF-1 is associated with multiple-domain cognitive impairment. I personally have extremely low IGF (~80 ng/ml) without rHGH. When I am not taking HGH my memory declines, cognitive horsepower decreases sharply, and creativity is diminished. When I am consistently on my prescription of 2 IU HGH daily, my cognitive function is excellent. I have not had time to read through this study thoroughly, but just from the abstract it would seem that this study would suggest the opposite to be true, as my IGF-1 was lower my cognitive function should be higher. Perhaps I am interpreting it incorrectly.
 

stx359

Active Member
While interesting this study looks at one of the most specific and genetically homogenous populations in the world, the Ashkenazi Jewish population. The medical/science world has long focused on this population because of it's longevity, it's relatively high incidence of some interesting genetic diseases and its genetic homogeneity. To this point here is a study from an Israeli university that found that 40% of the world's Ashkenazi Jewish population's genetic material comes from four women:
Gene tests show that two fifths of Ashkenazi Jews are descended from four women
Judy Siegel-Itzkovich
Copyright and License information Disclaimer

Four “founding mothers” who lived in Europe a thousand years ago were the ancestors of two fifths of all Ashkenazi (European origin) Jews. This is the conclusion of a team of researchers at the Technion&;Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, after they compared DNA sequences from nearly 2000 Jews with those of 11 500 non–Jewish people in 67 different populations around the world.
 

stx359

Active Member
Also the data shown in figure one demonstrate that their own data does not support the conclusion that "In conclusion, higher IGF-1 levels and bioavailability predicted mortality and morbidity risk."

For the non statisticians on the board when the lines on either side of the data point, known as error bars, cross the 1.0 point on the hazard ratio axis that means that statistically the two groups are not different. This was the case for three out of four study measurements. The only measurement that showed a mortality difference was IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratio and when they broke down the study group to males and females this only appeared to be true for females. In males there was no mortality difference in any of the study measurements.
 

sokaiya

Active Member
Tell that to Sly Stallone. i'm sure he wouldn't be kicking ass at age 73 with a "low IGF-1" Cheers to </= 2 IU HGH/day!
 
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Guided_by_Voices

Active Member
To the extent that the headline is supported by data, it may be that IGF-1 is just a marker for chronically elevated insulin, which is almost certainly very bad. Hence the name "insulin-like" growth factor
 

madhacker

Member
Interesting study !

Nelson,

What are your personal thoughts on growth hormone and IGF-1 for longevity?
 

madhacker

Member
Crazy how this study demonstrates that higher IGF-1 is associated with multiple-domain cognitive impairment. I personally have extremely low IGF (~80 ng/ml) without rHGH. When I am not taking HGH my memory declines, cognitive horsepower decreases sharply, and creativity is diminished. When I am consistently on my prescription of 2 IU HGH daily, my cognitive function is excellent. I have not had time to read through this study thoroughly, but just from the abstract it would seem that this study would suggest the opposite to be true, as my IGF-1 was lower my cognitive function should be higher. Perhaps I am interpreting it incorrectly.

Nir Barzilai studies centenarians and has found that lower IGF-1 levels in females improve cognitive function and extend lifespan. It has shown to be the opposite in males, not extending lifespan.


 
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DS3

Active Member
Nir Barzilai studies centenarians and has found that lower IGF-1 levels in women improve cognitive function and extend lifespan. It has shown to be the opposite in males, not extending lifespan.


Great post. Thank you for the resources!
 

schismz

New Member
Thus far, to my knowledge, the only paper ever published which demonstrated age-reversal occurred last fall and utilized primarily hGH and Metformin (+ DHEA, Vitamin D, and Zinc):


Here are Peter Attia's thoughts on above:


FWIW: I've been on full HRT for many years and my core stack includes Test cyp, hCG, hGH (2 IU daily), 2GM Metformin. My chronological age is 51, my biological age is 10 years younger. Having said all that, I Do All The Things, to the best of my ability to consistently do so. I don't eat garbage, I exercise, and I live the best lifestyle I can manage while having to travel a lot, time shift, and live in hotels for weeks at a time. COVID oddly enough has provided me with a welcome respite and replaced all that with endless Zoom meetings ;-)
 

Mark Saur

Active Member
Thus far, to my knowledge, the only paper ever published which demonstrated age-reversal occurred last fall and utilized primarily hGH and Metformin (+ DHEA, Vitamin D, and Zinc):


Here are Peter Attia's thoughts on above:


FWIW: I've been on full HRT for many years and my core stack includes Test cyp, hCG, hGH (2 IU daily), 2GM Metformin. My chronological age is 51, my biological age is 10 years younger. Having said all that, I Do All The Things, to the best of my ability to consistently do so. I don't eat garbage, I exercise, and I live the best lifestyle I can manage while having to travel a lot, time shift, and live in hotels for weeks at a time. COVID oddly enough has provided me with a welcome respite and replaced all that with endless Zoom meetings ;-)
What do your labs look like on that protocol? What T and HCG dose are you on?
 

madhacker

Member
Thus far, to my knowledge, the only paper ever published which demonstrated age-reversal occurred last fall and utilized primarily hGH and Metformin (+ DHEA, Vitamin D, and Zinc):


Here are Peter Attia's thoughts on above:


FWIW: I've been on full HRT for many years and my core stack includes Test cyp, hCG, hGH (2 IU daily), 2GM Metformin. My chronological age is 51, my biological age is 10 years younger. Having said all that, I Do All The Things, to the best of my ability to consistently do so. I don't eat garbage, I exercise, and I live the best lifestyle I can manage while having to travel a lot, time shift, and live in hotels for weeks at a time. COVID oddly enough has provided me with a welcome respite and replaced all that with endless Zoom meetings ;-)
Hi there,

thanks for sharing your experience.

What aging tests did you have performed ie. Telomere, epigenetic?

Epigenetic aging essentially measures damage that comes with aging so we think that the reversal of age seen in the TRIM study was to do with the increase in size of the thymus gland and it’s down stream effects on physiology.

After 10 years of consistent use how do you look and feel? Do you see a delayed result in terms of physical signs of aging such as skin, physical?

thanks for your contribution!
 

madhacker

Member
Thus far, to my knowledge, the only paper ever published which demonstrated age-reversal occurred last fall and utilized primarily hGH and Metformin (+ DHEA, Vitamin D, and Zinc):


Here are Peter Attia's thoughts on above:


FWIW: I've been on full HRT for many years and my core stack includes Test cyp, hCG, hGH (2 IU daily), 2GM Metformin. My chronological age is 51, my biological age is 10 years younger. Having said all that, I Do All The Things, to the best of my ability to consistently do so. I don't eat garbage, I exercise, and I live the best lifestyle I can manage while having to travel a lot, time shift, and live in hotels for weeks at a time. COVID oddly enough has provided me with a welcome respite and replaced all that with endless Zoom meetings ;-)
The conboy study showed a substantial reversal of epigenetic aging over the TRIM.

 

MarkLA

Member
Causality vs. Correlation

A year and half ago, I found this video
where Neal Rouzier drives home the difference between Causality and Correlation as relates to E2 management. Basically the gist is that higher E2 is associated with bad health in the study population, but that study population is unhealthy, fat, etc. He's saying that when E2 is high as a result of supplementation -- either through aromatization of T or even from directly supplementing with E2 that it is actually health promoting.

So, I apply that thinking to IGF-1 and think maybe only naturally high IGF-1 is a risk factor. Perhaps elevated IGF-1 due to HGH or GHRH analog peptides may be healthful?

Thoughts?
 

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