Do statins affect erections in men?

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
statins and ed.gif


Question:

Do statins affect erections in men?

Answer:

The science on statins and sexual function is inconclusive, but it does appear that taking a statin may sometimes affect a person's sex life.


Researchers looked at statin use and sexual function in 1,000 men and women, half of whom were given a statin and half of whom took a placebo. Over all, men on statins were about twice as likely as those taking placebos to report that their ability to achieve orgasm had become “somewhat worse” or “much worse.”

Dr. Beatrice Golomb, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, medical school, who helped conduct that study, says doctors don't always take patients seriously when they talk about side effects, sexual or otherwise. In other research, Dr. Golomb found that when patients complained about the most commonly recognized side effects of statins, their doctors denied the possibility of a connection more than half the time.

Medical problems that lead to a statin prescription might also be to blame for changes in sexual function, said Dr. Natan Bar-Chama, director of male reproductive medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. Statins are commonly prescribed for people with ailments such as diabetes or heart disease, which can cause erectile dysfunction. If the underlying disease improves when someone takes statins, then erectile function is likely to improve as well, he said.

http://mobile.nytimes.com/blogs/well/2015/04/03/ask-well-statins-and-your-sex-life/?hpw&rref=health&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=well-region
 

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
Statin Drugs Markedly Inhibit Testosterone Production by Rat Leydig Cells in Vitro: Implications for Men

Reproductive Toxicology
Available online 22 January 2014

Highlights

•Statins cause significant reductions in LH-stimulated testosterone production by rat Leydig cells; possible human relevance.

•Statin induced inhibition in testosterone production was bypassed by providing pregnenolone or progesterone.

•Bypassing the site of action with pregnenolone resulted in greater LH stimulated testosterone production than progesterone.

•LH responsiveness of Leydig cells was only maintained when progesterone was used to bypass the site of action.

Statin Drugs Markedly Inhibit Testosterone Production
 

Phoenix

New Member
After my second heart event (80% blockage of LAD) I was prescribed Simvastatin (generic for Zocor) in 2011. I'd take it at bed time and after an hour or so I would wake up with severe muscle and joint aches. This went on for about two weeks. I finally connected the dots and realized it was the Simvastatin and stopped taking it. I called my cardiologist and he sent me for blood tests to make sure no muscle damage was done. The kicker is that he wanted me to start taking the Simvastatin again after three weeks to see if it happened again. I said thanks, but no thanks! Luckily no damage was done that I know of.
I know that was a little off topic, but in doing my research on statin drugs I found several reports linking them to ED and potentially Alzheimer's.
 

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
Cederberg H, Stancakova A, Yaluri N, Modi S, Kuusisto J, et al.

Increased risk of diabetes with statin treatment is associated with impaired insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion: a 6
year follow-up study of the METSIM cohort.

Diabetologia. 2015;58(5):1109-17. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00125-015-3528-5



Aims/Hypothesis - The aim of this work was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the risk of type 2 diabetes associated with statin treatment in the population-based Metabolic Syndrome in Men (METSIM) cohort.


Methods - A total of 8,749 non-diabetic participants, aged 45–73 years, were followed up for 5.9 years. New diabetes was diagnosed in 625 men by means of an OGTT, HbA1c ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol) or glucose-lowering medication started during the follow-up. Insulin sensitivity and secretion were evaluated with OGTT-derived indices.


Results - Participants on statin treatment (N = 2,142) had a 46% increased risk of type 2 diabetes (adjusted HR 1.46 [95% CI 1.22, 1.74]). The risk was dose dependent for simvastatin and atorvastatin. Statin treatment significantly increased 2 h glucose (2hPG) and glucose AUC of an OGTT at follow-up, with a nominally significant increase in fasting plasma glucose (FPG).


Insulin sensitivity was decreased by 24% and insulin secretion by 12% in individuals on statin treatment (at FPG and 2hPG <5.0 mmol/l) compared with individuals without statin treatment (p&#8201;<&#8201;0.01). Decreases in insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion were dose dependent for simvastatin and atorvastatin.


Conclusions/Interpretation - Statin treatment increased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 46%, attributable to decreases in insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion.
 
Nelson,

I been on statins for more than 15 year and so far no problems. I have genetically high cholesterol and if not medicated it shuts up to above 300. There is very little I can do to lower it really because my liver naturally produces all that cholesterol and dieting is just a help of 10-15%. I can drink just water for a 3 week and still I would have high cholesterol. I believe there must be a reason for this.
More and more I am becoming convinced that the statins drugs are just making things worse. According to studies done: 50% of people that drop stone dead due to strokes and heart attacks had normal cholesterol values. So what conclusion can we draw from these facts?
Anyway If I understand your writing could be that progesterone might be a supplement to consider or? I wouldn´t like it but!!
“LH responsiveness of Leydig cells was only maintained when progesterone was used to bypass the site of action.” ?
 

Superman

New Member
I was on a statin temporarily a couple of years ago. It was a boner killer for me. And just made me feel tired/lethargic all of the time.

It felt like I was taking poison.
 

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
I guess statins provide benefits to these advanced prostate cancer patients.

Statins May Have Slowed Advanced Prostate Cancer Growth by 10 Months
When starting androgen deprivation therapy, advanced prostate cancer patients who were taking statins—popular cholesterol-lowering heart drugs—experienced 10 more months of cancer control, according to data published in JAMA Oncology.
“The surprising aspect was how dramatic the difference was in patients receiving statins,” Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Hematology and Oncology Fellow Jorge Ramos, D.O., told Drug Discovery & Development. Ramos was uninvolved in the new study.
Lab work done by a team from the Dana Farber Cancer Institute suggested a key reason may be that statins latch on to the same transporter receptors on prostate cancer cells as testosterone, blocking it. Since testosterone fuels prostate cancer, tumor growth slows.

http://www.dddmag.com/articles/2015/05/statins-may-have-slowed-advanced-prostate-cancer-growth-10-months?et_cid=4590645&et_rid=449166332&type=headline
 
My doc took me of Crestor today and put me on a natural product called "ArmoLipid Plus" (red rice etc…). I could not believe it after 15 years of statins use when all my docs have insisted and insisted on me taking statins and now, all of sudden, what is happing here. So I asked him why this change and he simply said - well your C.K is 392 U/L probably due to the Crestor intake (meaning I don´t have any muscles left now lol). Rat poison! Looking forward to take the new stuff now.
 

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
That CPK is not horrible but I do not blame him for switching you.

Here are several supplements shown in studies to lower LDL, triglycerides and/or increase HDL.

cholesterol supplements.jpg
 

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