Coronavirus COVID-19 Update: Hydroxychloroquine and Other Treatments

sammmy

Member
No actual double blind placebo controlled experiment in which you give the drug from the very beginning to everybody regardless how sick they are has been completed to prove anything.

Medical "studies" reach wrong conclusions 2 out of 3 times. That's why one month coffee is good, next month its a killer.
 

sammmy

Member
Yeah he heroically took it to prove it was safe. Jesus fuck how are you so stupid
To use your own 'language' so you can comprehend, it is 'fucking stupid' to believe everything the media publishes from badly made medical 'studies' that violate all basic principles of statistics 101 that neither the media nor you apparently have the expertise to actually evaluate.

Chloroquine is a drug that has been used for decades with no significant side effects. A track record like that, trumps any BS 'medical study'. And that is why Trump felt safe taking it. I like that guy more and more ...
 

Westin

Active Member
To use your own 'language' so you can comprehend, it is 'fucking stupid' to believe everything the media publishes from badly made medical 'studies' that violate all basic principles of statistics 101 that neither the media nor you apparently have the expertise to actually evaluate.

Chloroquine is a drug that has been used for decades with no significant side effects. A track record like that, trumps any BS 'medical study'. And that is why Trump felt safe taking it. I like that guy more and more ...
You should take it. Are you going to ask your doc for a script? Do you believe that much? Power to you! Let us know what your doc says. Im curious.
 

sammmy

Member
I do have a script for hydroxychloroquine and I filled it long time ago. I do not take the drug not because there is any proof that it's "harmful" but because there is still no validated proof that it works. Medical "researchers" for months are too busy vilifying the drug instead of doing even an elementary experiment with lab rats or monkeys to see if it prevents infection or reduces the symptoms of one if started early.

Hell, they aren't even sure how exactly it spreads - is it air-born or not. The answer is of course air-born. A virus that spreads only by touch cannot infect the whole world for such a short time.
 
How many times do people need to hear studies say it is not effective before they give up? You cant wish it or pray it effective, Science says It doesn't work for the purpose. Period.
 

Deno

New Member
Hydroxychloroquine is a prophylactic. Ivermectin blocks viral replication.

It's been used at major metro hospitals since early April. Source: a doc that works at one. Dr. Seheult also published a Medcram video about it. Episode 52 of his coronavirus updates.

Newsmax article: Breakthrough Drug: Ivermectin Shows 'Astounding' Results Against Coronavirus

Not surprisingly, as it is out of patent, it's cheap: an oral dose of Durvet apple-flavored dewormer costs $1.

Remdesivir, on the other hand, causes liver failure, organ failure. Oh and Gilead holds a patent on it! $1000 a patient.

Now you see why Lancet and New England Journal of Medicine had to publish stories slamming hydroxy, but recently retracted those 'studies' that falsely said things like hydroxy were worse than doing nothing. The solutions are already there, but bad actors have been pushing junk medicine.

Bad actors wanting you to suffer under their junk medicine while they siphon value off your ignorance, and you get misery and death.

I put out a release on April 7th about ivermectin, but neglected to post one to the forum. Oh well, hope nobody died unnecessarily.

The way ivermectin works, is by affecting the nervous system of parasites. It's not typically - up until covid19 - thought of as an antiviral. However, a side effect is blocking replication of certain RNA viruses. It's relatively safe to take as long as the person doesn't have other gastro issues.


Since I'm here, there is a particular covid strain that won't have a typical symptom of fever & cough. It might behoove you to get a pulse oximeter and look for unusual signs of a drop. Dosage, in either case, of ivermectin is by weight, typically at cough and fever of 100.5+.

 
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Deno

New Member
I didn't know about Pepcid, but Tagamet/cimetidine -another stomach drug, OTC on the states for about $16 for a box big enough to treat 4 adults- has an immunoregulatory effect of suppressing the cytoxic 'storm' while enhancing the 'helper cells' at the same time.

It *was* used prior to the discovery of ivermectin's effectiveness at eliminating the virus. IDK if it's still being used.

Dosage is 200mg x 2 the first day, then 600mg x 2 thereafter, begun only when symptomatic.

 
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Tagamet has been on the list of supplements recommended by Life Extension as treatment for flu for years. I've used the protocol a few times and it appears to have been effective in those cases. If I felt I was getting ill and possibly COVID, I would employ them again. The other supplements recommended in the protocol are Lactoferrin, DHEA, Garlic (aged and high allicin), Zinc Acetate lozenges and of course Cimetidine. I would throw in Citicoline and PEA too.
 
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DragonBits

Well-Known Member
FDA revokes emergency use ruling for hydroxychloroquine, the drug touted by Trump as a Covid-19 therapy


WASHINGTON — The Food and Drug Administration on Monday said it had withdrawn an emergency approval for use of the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a Covid-19 treatment.

Almost since the beginning of the novel coronavirus pandemic, President Trump and other world leaders have touted hydroxychloroquine as an effective treatment based on scattered anecdotes, not reliable scientific studies. But the FDA said Monday that the drug, along with chloroquine, is “unlikely to be effective in treating Covid-19,” and highlighted “serious side effects.”

The FDA’s withdrawal of the emergency use order, which Politico first reported, appears to formally close the door on U.S. officials’ willingness to use the drug to prevent or treat Covid-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

In recent weeks, an increasingly conclusive body of research showed the drug was not effective at treating Covid-19 or at preventing the respiratory disease from developing in individuals who’d been exposed to the virus.

The controversy has pitted Trump and his high-profile allies against the country’s scientific establishment. Rick Bright, a prominent government scientist, has alleged he was ousted from his vaccine-development role after he opposed the initial emergency approval for hydroxychloroquine. At a March press conference, Trump said his belief in the drug was “just a feeling,” contradicting Tony Fauci, the country’s top infectious disease researcher, who told reporters minutes before there was no reliable evidence supporting hydroxychloroquine’s use.


Despite the lack of evidence supporting the drug’s use, Trump continued to tout it as a promising tool to treat and prevent Covid-19, even announcing last month that he had taken a regimen of hydroxychloroquine as a safeguard.

Asked for comment, an FDA spokesman directed STAT to an online list of current emergency use authorizations for Covid-19 medical products. The list no longer includes hydroxychloroquine.


In a letter to Gary Disbrow, the acting director of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, a top FDA official said the withdrawal of the hydroxychloroquine approval was based on recent science that showed the drug to be ineffective.

“Today’s request to revoke is based on new information, including clinical trial data results, that have led BARDA to conclude that this drug may not be effective to treat [Covid-19] and that the drug’s potential benefits for such use do not outweigh its known and potential risks,” wrote Denise Hinton, the FDA’s chief scientist.

The FDA had previously expressed concerns about broad use of hydroxychloroquine, issuing a pointed warning in late April that cautioned against use of the drug outside the setting of a hospital or clinical trial.

Later Monday, the FDA also warned against using hydroxychloroquine in conjunction with remdesivir, the Gilead Sciences drug that has shown some efficacy as a Covid-19 treatment. Co-administration of the drugs, the agency said in a statement, “is not recommended as it may result in reduced antiviral activity of remdesivir.”

While the hydroxychloroquine saga largely pitted politicians against scientists, the science underpinning the debate also proved, at times, surprisingly unreliable. Earlier this month, the Lancet, a leading medical journal, retracted an influential study that suggested hydroxychloroquine wasn’t just ineffective but also potentially unsafe for use as a Covid-19 treatment.

Nicholas Florko contributed reporting.

 

charile12

Member
To use your own 'language' so you can comprehend, it is 'fucking stupid' to believe everything the media publishes from badly made medical 'studies' that violate all basic principles of statistics 101 that neither the media nor you apparently have the expertise to actually evaluate.

Chloroquine is a drug that has been used for decades with no significant side effects. A track record like that, trumps any BS 'medical study'. And that is why Trump felt safe taking it. I like that guy more and more ...
I agree.
It is so safe pregnant woman can take and children. These are
facts.
 
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MarkLA

Member
With HCQ no longer on the FDA emergency use list, can doctors prescribe it off-label like everything else without risking their medical license?
 

Cataceous

Well-Known Member
This study found benefit in hydroxychloroquine when it's given early.

Researchers at the Henry Ford Health System in Southeast Michigan have found that early administration of the drug hydroxychloroquine makes hospitalized patients substantially less likely to die.
The study, published in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases, determined that hydroxychloroquine provided a "66% hazard ratio reduction," and hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin a 71 percent reduction, compared to neither treatment.
In-hospital mortality was 18.1 percent with both drugs, 13.5 percent with just hydroxychloroquine, 22.4 percent with azithromycin alone, and 26.4 percent with neither drug. "Prospective trials are needed" for further review, the researchers note.
"Our results do differ from some other studies," Dr. Marcus Zervos, who heads the hospital's infectious diseases unit, said at a news conference. "What we think was important in ours ... is that patients were treated early. For hydroxychloroquine to have a benefit, it needs to begin before the patients begin to suffer some of the severe immune reactions that patients can have with COVID."
Link.
 

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