Alkaline Water Facts

Thread starter #1
Total scam or health-promoting drink? I cover the topic below and the answer is probably not what you'd expect:

One can’t throw the proverbial rock and not hit yet another obnoxious ad of some sort for alkaline water, with claims to cure all that ails ya, from genital warts to fear of flying. OK, a tad of an exaggeration on my end, but the list of what alkaline water promises to cure is extensive, usually bordering on the ridiculous, and sets of my BS alarms to the max, as It should for any science minded person. Claims such as it restores pH balance by reducing “acidity levels in the blood” and “reduces water cluster size which allows water to penetrate cells more easily” and the always favorite detox angles such as “eliminates mucus build-up on colon walls, thus improving the body’s ability to absorb important nutrients” as well as helps “…flushing out acidic waste and toxins that have accumulated in the body over time” to name just a plethora of pseudo-science claims out there for alkaline water. Of course it’s also claimed on some web pages to help with weight loss, slow the aging process, improve energy, relieve depression, improve well-being, as well as increase manly muscle missile girth, to name a few more claims I have seen. Ok, that last one was wishful thinking on my end, but I also wouldn’t be shocked to see someone claiming it about alkaline water.

Cont:

https://brinkzone.com/alkaline-water-total-scam-or-health-promoting-drink/
 
#2
Total scam or health-promoting drink? I cover the topic below and the answer is probably not what you'd expect:
If you are concerned about blood acidity, then it is "tightly regulated", and drinking alkaline water will not achieve anything. See Acid–base homeostasis - Wikipedia

If you think alkaline water will reduce stomach acidity, then it won't. You need to drink a MASSIVE amount of water (that would probably kill you), e.g. 5L for a one point change from PH=2 to PH=3. See here: Does drinking water right after a meal cause dilution of stomach acid?

IMVHO bro-science at best, marketing scam at worst. Namaste.
 
#4
If you are concerned about blood acidity, then it is "tightly regulated", and drinking alkaline water will not achieve anything. See Acid–base homeostasis - Wikipedia

If you think alkaline water will reduce stomach acidity, then it won't. You need to drink a MASSIVE amount of water (that would probably kill you), e.g. 5L for a one point change from PH=2 to PH=3. See here: Does drinking water right after a meal cause dilution of stomach acid?

IMVHO bro-science at best, marketing scam at worst. Namaste.

You didn't read the article or not very well. The use of bicarbonate to increase serum CO2 (almost all bicarbonate at serum pH) and improve anaerobic performance threshold is well documented:

Sodium bicarbonate intake improves high-intensity intermittent exercise performance in trained young men

1566497173463.png



Chronic Ingestion of Sodium and Potassium Bicarbonate, with Potassium, Magnesium and Calcium Citrate Improves Anaerobic Performance in Elite Soccer Players


Thanks for the article Will. I thought is was well balanced and realistic.

Easy experiment for folks to try at home (assuming they can handle potassium):
consume 3 g per day of potassium bicarbonate for 30 days. Compare fasted CMP14 (namely serum CO2) before and after.
 
#6
Welcome my world. People commenting without reading, is the bane of my existence.



Thanx for taking the time to read it. The buffer thing does work performance wise, and may have health implications also.
Yeah great point. After modified keto diet (with lots of veggies) for a number of years, my serum CO2 levels were a little on the low side 24-25 meq/L according to one of my providers. I now typically take 3 g of KHCO3 and 3 g of taurine with water before or after workout. The taurine seems like a no-brainer with little potential risk. After a month supplementing with bicarb, serum CO2 increased to 27 meq which has been consistent. Some studies out there on RA and bicarb as well. If your health doesn't preclude it, KHCO3 seems like a better choice than NaHCO3 and doesn't taste quite as bad in water.

Thanks again for taking the time to write the article.
 
Thread starter #7
Yeah great point. After modified keto diet (with lots of veggies) for a number of years, my serum CO2 levels were a little on the low side 24-25 meq/L according to one of my providers. I now typically take 3 g of KHCO3 and 3 g of taurine with water before or after workout. The taurine seems like a no-brainer with little potential risk. After a month supplementing with bicarb, serum CO2 increased to 27 meq which has been consistent. Some studies out there on RA and bicarb as well. If your health doesn't preclude it, KHCO3 seems like a better choice than NaHCO3 and doesn't taste quite as bad in water.

Thanks again for taking the time to write the article.
Where are you purchasing your KHCO3? NaHCO3 while cheap, does taste pretty terrible and I'm very tolerant of stuff that tastes bad generally. I take taurine on and off as I remember. Only so much stuff we can take before it becomes a damn full time job!
 
#8
Where are you purchasing your KHCO3? NaHCO3 while cheap, does taste pretty terrible and I'm very tolerant of stuff that tastes bad generally. I take taurine on and off as I remember. Only so much stuff we can take before it becomes a damn full time job!
The big bag!
Amazon

Weird I bought 1 kg for $18 a few months ago now the website says 100 g for $11. Hmmm.
 
Top