Inflammation: Do you measure c-reactive HS-CRP?

DragonBits

Active Member
Thread starter #1
Inflammation; often talked about, but seldom measured. Inflammation is key to many problems, but I seldom see people here either measure C-reactive protein (CRP) or talk about CRP.

(Most of us would need to use the High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HS-CRP) test unless we have an autoimmune disease like Crohn's that causes a much higher CRP.)

The hsCRP test is fairly cheap ($30-$35), and it’s listed among the top ten important tests life extension recommend people get.

hsCRP isn’t the only inflammation markers, but it appears it is downstream of most all other markers of inflammation. IE: Cytokines like Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) should cause higher CRP.

hsCRP is non-specific, meaning it could be higher because you have an infection, vascular disease, autoimmune conditions, smoking, high blood pressure, and high blood sugar just to mention a few causes. Even intensive exercise such as a 3-hour run can cause a significant short term rise in HS-CRP, from 2 >12. Hs-CRP is a very general indication of inflammation somewhere in your body.

The Effects of Physical Activity on Serum C-Reactive Protein and Inflammatory Markers

Exercise and hs-CRP

Though greater exercise capacity results in a lower hsCRP.

I have been able to lower my hs-CRP significantly over the last year, though there have been so many changes it would be hard to pinpoint any key change. Besides starting TRT, I lost 30 lbs. of weight, lowered my A1C from 5.8>5,2, raised HDL from 36>55, lowered Trig from 178>96m, increased exercise capacity and took several supplements like aged garlic, turmeric, baby aspirin and 5oz of wine a night. I was on and off metformin, I have yet to test what if anything changed while I have been off it. My BG seems well controlled even without metF. I was also on several courses of 10-day antibiotics when I had some periodontal work. So, any combination of those items can have an effect.

1/5/2018 3.49 mg/L
4/21/2018 2.01 mg/L
9/24/2018 1.75 mg/L
2/4/2019 1.44 mg/L
3/9/20190 0.6 mg/L

Have many here have measured their hs-CRP, and if not, why not? If you have measured it, was it above 1? Above 1 is a higher risk of CVD.

I didn't see this as a topic and thought is should be an important part of at least initial blood tests.
 
#2
I have monitored CRP for over 10 years. A family history of both coronary disease and an array of autoimmune issues, I deal with hypogonadism, adrenal insufficiency (Addison’s Disease), microscopic colitis, pernicious (B-12 deficiency) anemia, and discoid lupus, meant that this particular marker was of interest. My reading exceeded 1.0...I clock in at 1.2 on a consistent basis.

Happily, despite the list of issues noted above, my cardiac health is good and I follow and manage the other problems. In my case, I expected an elevated result and wasn’t surprised. I’ve stepped up exercise and may introduce some supplements to target the overall value.
 

DragonBits

Active Member
Thread starter #3
I have monitored CRP for over 10 years. A family history of both coronary disease and an array of autoimmune issues, I deal with hypogonadism, adrenal insufficiency (Addison’s Disease), microscopic colitis, pernicious (B-12 deficiency) anemia, and discoid lupus, meant that this particular marker was of interest. My reading exceeded 1.0...I clock in at 1.2 on a consistent basis.

Happily, despite the list of issues noted above, my cardiac health is good and I follow and manage the other problems. In my case, I expected an elevated result and wasn’t surprised. I’ve stepped up exercise and may introduce some supplements to target the overall value.
I think given your history a 1.2 is quite good. Congrats are in order.
 
#5
I have had 2 HS CRP tests this year 0.2 and 0.4. I just had a Cardiac Calcium Score done also. I Scored a zero.
Cold exposure is excellent for lowering inflammation. Getting outside in the cold, ice baths, even cold showers.
 

DragonBits

Active Member
Thread starter #6
I have had 2 HS CRP tests this year 0.2 and 0.4. I just had a Cardiac Calcium Score done also. I Scored a zero.
Cold exposure is excellent for lowering inflammation. Getting outside in the cold, ice baths, even cold showers.
Well, I am a hedonist while you maybe a spartan. We are coming at this from opposite ends.

For me hot bath up to 110 F is great, saunas and jacuzzis are de rigueur. I spent one New Years in Vienna, but really Baden-Baden is where i retreated to.

SO not going to take cold baths/showers, besides I would want proof it really does work for general inflammation, I think it's more theory than reality. RICE for injury for sure, but outside of that give me a Jacuzzi.

I also had a Cardiac Calcium score, mine was 79, but I am 13 years older, maybe you will catch up. I will retake sometime this year to see how it goes. If it stays the same I am winning, if it goes down it would be unusual. Naturally I am hoping on going down.
 

xqfq

New Member
#7
My TRT doctor measured hs-CRP in his initial labs, which is how I learned about it. My score at the time was 0.6.

In addition to hs-CRP, MPO and Lp-PLA2 are two other tests that measure cardiovascular related inflammation.

There's some information here:

Blood Tests to Determine Risk of Coronary Artery Disease Test Details | Cleveland Clinic

Getting either an NMR Lipid test or an ApoB and Apo A-1 test are also important as standard lipid panels (LDL-C / HDL-C) may not paint the full picture. I plan on getting an NMR, MPO and Lp-PLA2 test once I've stopped dieting (I've read that dieting can cause temporary elevations in lipids).
 

DragonBits

Active Member
Thread starter #8
My TRT doctor measured hs-CRP in his initial labs, which is how I learned about it. My score at the time was 0.6.

In addition to hs-CRP, MPO and Lp-PLA2 are two other tests that measure cardiovascular related inflammation.

There's some information here:

Blood Tests to Determine Risk of Coronary Artery Disease Test Details | Cleveland Clinic

Getting either an NMR Lipid test or an ApoB and Apo A-1 test are also important as standard lipid panels (LDL-C / HDL-C) may not paint the full picture. I plan on getting an NMR, MPO and Lp-PLA2 test once I've stopped dieting (I've read that dieting can cause temporary elevations in lipids).
Coincidentally I got the NMR lipid test yesterday, (Friday). I had been interested in that test for many years.

I also took a "Omega-3 Index Complete" test that Life Extension recommends. That tests for the following.

Omega-3 Index
Trans Fat Index
Omega-6:Omega-3 Ratio
AA:EPA ratio
Full Fatty Acid Profile including:
Omega-3s
Omega-6s
Monounsaturated
Saturated
Trans

The MPO and Lp-PLA2 are good tests for cardiovascular related inflammation,though I doubt I will get them anytime soon, I feel "tested out". Friday they took I think 14 vials of blood and four separate blood draws, two in each arm over the course of 3 hours.

Besides NMR, I took the 8 sample glucose tolerance test, C0Q10, total T/FT, shbg, CRP, FreeT3 and PSA.

On my wish list is a neurotransmitter panel, aldosterone, spectracell micronutrient test and dutch plus test. The dutch plus test includes free cortisol, and the total and distribution of cortisol metabolites. The DUTCH Plus adds the Cortisol Awakening Response (CAR).

I was interested in aldosterone and cortisol because 50% if the time my serum level of potassium is a little over range and often I get up in the middle of the night, which could be cortisol.

But likely I will only get the neurotransmitter panel unless I get a job to help pay for all of this.

Besides, mostly just curiosity, though the neurotransmitter panel, cortisol and aldosterone may be useful.
 
#9
My CRP has been around 1.2. I am disappointed and puzzled as to why it isn't lower, especially after I eliminated a food sensitivity. That said, I think it is under-studied by mainstream medicine so perhaps there is a lot of individual variation not directly related to harmful inflammation.
 
Thread starter #10
My CRP has been around 1.2. I am disappointed and puzzled as to why it isn't lower, especially after I eliminated a food sensitivity. That said, I think it is under-studied by mainstream medicine so perhaps there is a lot of individual variation not directly related to harmful inflammation.
I added several supplements and lost weight in an effort to reduce my hs-crp. HS-CRP went from 3.49 > 0.6 in about a year.

Known ways to reduce hs-crp are statin therapy, moderate alcohol consumption, exercise and low-dose aspirin.

I don't take stains, but at least 5 oz of wine or 1.5 oz of alcohol a night, baby aspirin. The exercise I am not sure about since I Have always exercised, but recently I did lose >30 lbs of weight.

My triglycerides went down and HDL went up, LDL is still a little high.

I do take aged black garlic, turmeric/curcumin, high dose Vit K and lycopene BUT I don't think any of those had an affect on hs-crp. I also reduced carbs.

IMO alcohol probably had the biggest effect. I could cut out the baby aspirin to see what happens.
 
Thread starter #11
My CRP has been around 1.2. I am disappointed and puzzled as to why it isn't lower, especially after I eliminated a food sensitivity. That said, I think it is under-studied by mainstream medicine so perhaps there is a lot of individual variation not directly related to harmful inflammation.
I just got in results from another c-reactive CRP test.

My CRP went up from 0.6>0.9 in about a month. I stopped two supplements/meds the same time a month ago.

I stopped taking LEF Ultra Prostate formula, and I stopped taking metformin. I am pretty sure the prostate formula had boosted my SHBG from 42>66 and stopping it should let SHBG go back to normal for me. How that affects PSA I won't know until I test for it.

I googled the action of metformin on CRP and found it usually causes a decrease in CRP, so my theory is stopping the Met was the the reason my CRP went up. I only stopped the Met to see how it affected my general BG and exercise capacity.

Just an FYI on what might work to decrease CRP.
 
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