Eat the Whole Egg: It is Better for Your Good Cholesterol

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
Thread starter #1
eggs.jpg



Egg consumption modulates HDL lipid composition and increases the cholesterol-accepting capacity of serum in metabolic syndrome.



Authors: Andersen CJ,et al. Lipids. 2013 Jun;48(6):557-67. Epub 2013 Mar 15.




Abstract


We recently demonstrated that daily whole egg consumption during moderate carbohydrate restriction leads to greater increases in plasma HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and improvements in HDL profiles in metabolic syndrome (MetS) when compared to intake of a yolk-free egg substitute. We further investigated the effects of this intervention on HDL composition and function, hypothesizing that the phospholipid species present in egg yolk modulate HDL lipid composition to increase the cholesterol-accepting capacity of subject serum. Men and women classified with MetS were randomly assigned to consume either three whole eggs (EGG, n = 20) per day or the equivalent amount of egg substitute (SUB, n = 17) throughout a 12-week moderate carbohydrate-restricted (25-30 % of energy) diet. Relative to other HDL lipids, HDL-cholesteryl ester content increased in all subjects, with greater increases in the SUB group. Further, HDL-triacylglycerol content was reduced in EGG group subjects with normal baseline plasma HDL-C, resulting in increases in HDL-CE/TAG ratios in both groups. Phospholipid analysis by mass spectrometry revealed that HDL became enriched in phosphatidylethanolamine in the EGG group, and that EGG group HDL better reflected sphingomyelin species present in the whole egg product at week 12 compared to baseline. Further, macrophage cholesterol efflux to EGG subject serum increased from baseline to week 12, whereas no changes were observed in the SUB group. Together, these findings suggest that daily egg consumption promotes favorable shifts in HDL lipid composition and function beyond increasing plasma HDL-C in MetS.
 
#2
View attachment 428



Egg consumption modulates HDL lipid composition and increases the cholesterol-accepting capacity of serum in metabolic syndrome.



Authors: Andersen CJ,et al. Lipids. 2013 Jun;48(6):557-67. Epub 2013 Mar 15.


Abstract


We recently demonstrated that daily whole egg consumption during moderate carbohydrate restriction leads to greater increases in plasma HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and improvements in HDL profiles in metabolic syndrome (MetS) when compared to intake of a yolk-free egg substitute. We further investigated the effects of this intervention on HDL composition and function, hypothesizing that the phospholipid species present in egg yolk modulate HDL lipid composition to increase the cholesterol-accepting capacity of subject serum. Men and women classified with MetS were randomly assigned to consume either three whole eggs (EGG, n = 20) per day or the equivalent amount of egg substitute (SUB, n = 17) throughout a 12-week moderate carbohydrate-restricted (25-30 % of energy) diet. Relative to other HDL lipids, HDL-cholesteryl ester content increased in all subjects, with greater increases in the SUB group. Further, HDL-triacylglycerol content was reduced in EGG group subjects with normal baseline plasma HDL-C, resulting in increases in HDL-CE/TAG ratios in both groups. Phospholipid analysis by mass spectrometry revealed that HDL became enriched in phosphatidylethanolamine in the EGG group, and that EGG group HDL better reflected sphingomyelin species present in the whole egg product at week 12 compared to baseline. Further, macrophage cholesterol efflux to EGG subject serum increased from baseline to week 12, whereas no changes were observed in the SUB group. Together, these findings suggest that daily egg consumption promotes favorable shifts in HDL lipid composition and function beyond increasing plasma HDL-C in MetS.
Yep, as I posted before to "Eat the Whole Damn Egg". Can't understand why all these fitness-minded people still insist on still eating the whites only. They are behind the times. Healthy fat does not make you fat!
 
#3
Better yet, eat pasture raised eggs (not just organic or "cage free") laid by happy chickens, not penned chickens eating soy, corn and wheat, etc. The yolks in these truly natural eggs contain more healthy Omega 3 fatty acids.
 

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
Thread starter #4
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Mol Nutr Food Res. 2019 Mar;63(5):e1800605. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201800605. Epub 2018 Dec 18.
Metabolic Profiling of High Egg Consumption and the Associated Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Middle-Aged Finnish Men.

Noerman S1, Kärkkäinen O1, Mattsson A2,3, Paananen J2, Lehtonen M4,5, Nurmi T1, Tuomainen TP1, Voutilainen S1, Hanhineva K1,5, Virtanen JK1.

1
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, 70210, Finland.
2
Bioinformatics Center, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, 70210, Finland.
3
Department of Mathematics and System Analysis, Aalto University, Aalto, 00076, Finland.
4
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, 70210, Finland.
5
LC-MS Metabolomics Center, Biocenter Kuopio, Kuopio, 70210, Finland.

Abstract
SCOPE:
Higher egg intake was previously associated with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study (KIHD) in eastern Finland. Potential compounds that can explain this association are explored using nontargeted LC-MS-based metabolic profiling.

METHODS AND RESULTS:
Two hundred and thirty-nine baseline serum samples from the KIHD are analyzed in four groups: subjects with higher (mean intake one egg per day) or lower (mean intake two eggs per week) egg intake who developed T2D (cases) or remained heatlhy (controls) during the mean follow-up of 19.3 years. Different serum profiles of subjects who had either higher or lower egg intakes, and of those who developed type 2 diabetes or remained healthy, are observed. The higher baseline tyrosine level predicts higher odds of T2D (OR 1.94; 95% CI 1.45, 2.60; p < 0.001; FDR 0.023) along with an unknown hexose-containing compound (OR 2.13; 95% CI 1.57, 2.88; p < 0.001; FDR 0.005). Certain predominant metabolites in T2D cases are correlated positively with ones in the lower-egg-intake group and negatively with ones in the higher-egg-intake group.

CONCLUSION:
Our current findings may underline some potential metabolites that can explain how egg intake is associated with a lower risk of T2D.
 
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