Stop taking Vitamin D already

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Gman86

Member
I think that vitamin D is one of the most important supplements someone can take, and probably the best deal on the market for any supplement. You can get about a half year’s supply for 15 bucks. On an anecdotal level it absolutely helps my mental state in the winter. It also helps preserve bone mass in all people. I’ve also seen enough studies on its effects regarding infectious diseases like Covid and even other issues like cancer or autoimmune disorders. Our modern lifestyles lead to tons of health issues, and imho vitamin D deficiency is one of the more impactful ones.
How many iu’s of vitamin D do u take throughout the year? I say throughout the year just incase ur dose changes with the seasons
 
Defy Medical TRT clinic doctor
Vitamin D seems to be an anti-inflammatory i.e. immuno-suppressing, not "immune-boosting". That explains how it can be used in COVID - remember that immune-suppressing corticosteroids reduce COVID mortality.

It was also shown in placebo double-blind studies that vit D supplementation reduced respiratory infections. However, I am guessing, it reduced the SYMPTOMS or such infections (like any anti-inflammatory), which made some infections non-symptomatic, hence "reduced their number".

Here is an extensive review of vit D studies: Vitamin D and inflammatory diseases

You should ignore any Retrospective, Prospective, and Cross-sectional studies. These are just correlation and do not show or prove vitamin D will treat anything. Rely only on double-blind interventional studies in humans.
Vitamin does a lot more than just reduce or prevent inflammation.


The beneficial effects of vitamin D on protective immunity are due in part to its effects on the innate immune system. It is known that macrophages recognize lipopolysacharide LPS, a surrogate for bacterial infection, through toll like receptors (TLR). Engagement of TLRs leads to a cascade of events that produce peptides with potent bacterialcidal activity such as cathelocidin and beta defensin 4[16]. These peptides colocalize within phagosomes with injested bacteria where they disrupt bacterial cell membranes and have potent anti-microbacterial activity [17].
Vitamin D plays an important part in the innate antimicrobial response. TLR binding leads to increased expression of both the 1-α-hydroxylase and the VDR[17-18]. This results in binding of the 1,25 D-VDR-RXR heterodimer to the VDREs of the genes for cathelocidin and beta defensin 4 and subsequent transcription of these proteins. Transcription of cathelocidin is absolutely dependent on sufficient 25 D[17]. It is now clear that transcription of beta defensin 4 requires binding of NFkB to appropriate response elements on the beta defensin 4 RNA[19]. TLR 2-1 signaling facilitates IL-1 receptor engagement which results in translocation of NFkB to its binding site[19].


 
How many iu’s of vitamin D do u take throughout the year? I say throughout the year just incase ur dose changes with the seasons
I used to only take it during the winter, but I noticed after starting TRT that when I dropped it that spring due to getting outside enough I noticed a negative difference. Not sure if my body requires more now or what, but I take it all year every day for the most part now(10,000 ius/day). I would also note that I take liquid vitamin D as it’s bioavailability is much better than pill or gelcap form. Still waiting on the results for my bloodwork last week, but when I did bloodwork in Jan. my vitamin D level was 49.3 on a range of 30-100. So even in Jan. I maintained good levels, and I think that has really helped me avoid illnesses the last few years. And like I said I started to continue to supplement throughout the summer on most days, so I’ll be interested to see what my levels are from my recent bloodwork. I don’t pay much attention to those though, because we know in a lot of instances the daily recommended amount is just what is required to avoid deficiency, not what is required for optimal bodily performance. That’s like saying “if you take this much vitamin C you’ll avoid scurvy so that’s what we recommend”. Obviously that’s hyperbole, but sadly closer to the truth than it should be.
 

Mastodont

Member
Can you expand on the UVB therapy? Why did you only do it one winter?
It cost money, but there are way worse ways to spend money for sure, d-25 went from 55 to 66. Got a nice tan too, those uvb sessions start off at 1 min, pretty intense, not sure if the most natural either, it's hard to find a sun that burns pale skin that fast.
 

BigTex

Well-Known Member
Interesting that D3 serves a purpose in dealing with the obese. Usually they are deficient.

Ozorowski M, Wiciński M, Wróbel Ł, Fajkiel-Madajczyk A. Cholecalciferol supplementation lowers leptin and TMAO but increases NO and VEGF-A levels in obese vitamin D deficient patients: Is it one of the potential cardioprotective mechanisms of vitamin D? Nutr Metab (Lond). 2022 Apr 29;19(1):31. doi: 10.1186/s12986-022-00666-4. PMID: 35488267; PMCID: PMC9052493.

A statistically significant reduction leptin and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) levels was observed. At the same time, nitric oxide (NO) and vascular endothelial growth factor (AVEGF-A) levels increased statistically significantly.

Conclusion: This study indicates that restoring normal 25(OH)D3 levels in obese people reduces the concentration of pro-inflammatory factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. Reducing inflammation and the potential impact on vascular reactivity leads to the conclusion that cholecalciferol supplementation in obese patients may benefit the cardiovascular system.

As we know, leptin is a hormone your body releases that helps it maintain your normal weight on a long-term basis. The level of leptin in your blood is directly related to how much body fat you have. TMAO is the gut microbes that live symbiotically within the human digestive tract and play important roles in host defense, immunity, and nutrient processing and absorption.
 

Mastodont

Member
Interesting that D3 serves a purpose in dealing with the obese. Usually they are deficient.

Ozorowski M, Wiciński M, Wróbel Ł, Fajkiel-Madajczyk A. Cholecalciferol supplementation lowers leptin and TMAO but increases NO and VEGF-A levels in obese vitamin D deficient patients: Is it one of the potential cardioprotective mechanisms of vitamin D? Nutr Metab (Lond). 2022 Apr 29;19(1):31. doi: 10.1186/s12986-022-00666-4. PMID: 35488267; PMCID: PMC9052493.

A statistically significant reduction leptin and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) levels was observed. At the same time, nitric oxide (NO) and vascular endothelial growth factor (AVEGF-A) levels increased statistically significantly.

Conclusion: This study indicates that restoring normal 25(OH)D3 levels in obese people reduces the concentration of pro-inflammatory factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. Reducing inflammation and the potential impact on vascular reactivity leads to the conclusion that cholecalciferol supplementation in obese patients may benefit the cardiovascular system.

As we know, leptin is a hormone your body releases that helps it maintain your normal weight on a long-term basis. The level of leptin in your blood is directly related to how much body fat you have. TMAO is the gut microbes that live symbiotically within the human digestive tract and play important roles in host defense, immunity, and nutrient processing and absorption.

It would be nice to have a survey, where you would have fat and thin people tested, i am pretty sure both groups would be deficient nowadays.
Now i am not sure those differences are significant;

Leptin concentration decreased from 16.90 ± 1.65 ng/ml to 14.72 ± 1.78 ng/ml and TMAO concentration from 63.41 ± 12.59 ng/ml to 59.98 ± 12.36 ng/ml. A significant increase in VEGF-A (298.81 ± 27.44 vs. 322.91 ± 26.02 pg/ml), NO (39.19 ± 10.96 vs. 70.02 ± 13.80 µmol/l) and 25(OH)D serum levels (18.22 ± 1.10 vs. 29.89 ± 1.16 ng/ml) was observed (Fig. 2).

This however at 2000iu is a great encouragement for many who think more is better, wish they also had one group only doing 1000iu to compare.
Long term safety of isolated d supplementation remains to be seen.
 

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com

 

BigTex

Well-Known Member

They scary part is about 40% of Americans and 50% of the worlds population are deficient in Vitamin D.

Forrest KY, Stuhldreher WL. Prevalence and correlates of vitamin D deficiency in US adults. Nutr Res. 2011 Jan;31(1):48-54. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2010.12.001. PMID: 21310306.

Not only is the lack of consuming food high in D vitamins, like milk but people not getting out in the sun, plus the increase in the rates of obesity. A body mass index greater than 30 is associated with lower vitamin D levels. Fat cells keep vitamin D isolated so that it’s not released. Obesity often requires taking larger doses of vitamin D supplements to reach and maintain normal levels.
 
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readalot

Member
I''ll have to study this more thoroughly.

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Related comments and cited refs on Vitamin D in athletes.
 

BigTex

Well-Known Member
Thanks for posting that. I am going to spend they day looking into this too. I think so far we have a lot of research to do in this area.

I know diet is key to reducing inflammatory conditions. One study found that ingesting electrolyte/carbohydrate solutions during the workout reduced the cortisol response 10-fold compared with drinking water alone. There has also been quite a lot of research done in decreasing the amount of omega 6 and increasing increasing intake of omega-3 fats. Omega 3 decrease inflammation while omega 6 increase inflammation. Getting 7–8 hours of sleep is also very critical to maintaining biochemical homeostasis and eliminating chronic inflammation. Lifestyle pattern that cause emotional stress combine with high intensity problems are known to cause health issues.

Rose GL, Skinner TL, Mielke GI, Schaumberg MA. The effect of exercise intensity on chronic inflammation: A systematic review and meta-analysis. J Sci Med Sport. 2021 Apr;24(4):345-351. doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2020.10.004. Epub 2020 Oct 23. PMID: 33153926.

Conclusions: Exercise intensity did not influence chronic inflammatory response.


I guess something else we need to look at is the cost benefits relationship between working out excessively and very little.

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Here is another interesting artlcle..

 
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TorontoTRT

Active Member
Stupidest post I’ve ever read. If you don’t want to take D3 or don’t feel good on it, that’s you. I hope no one listens to this bullshit. Sounds like a main stream media shill pushing this. Take your D3 people.
 

readalot

Member
Stupidest post I’ve ever read
Come on now....you don't really mean that. The first post in this thread is the stupidest post you have ever read?


I am pretty sure you have read this, no?

 

readalot

Member

BigTex

Well-Known Member
Stupidest post I’ve ever read. If you don’t want to take D3 or don’t feel good on it, that’s you. I hope no one listens to this bullshit. Sounds like a main stream media shill pushing this. Take your D3 people.
I couldn't agree with you more. If you don't want to take D3 then don't. As a matter of fact, if you have made up you mind not to take it then why bother reading this thread? No sense aggravating yourself with useless information, right?
 

TorontoTRT

Active Member
Same people who tell you to stop taking d3 are the sane people who tell you melatonin is “bad”. Do your own research people. If new accounts starts spewing weird anti supplement propaganda, question their motives.
 

Funkodyssey

Active Member
Same people who tell you to stop taking d3 are the sane people who tell you melatonin is “bad”. Do your own research people. If new accounts starts spewing weird anti supplement propaganda, question their motives.
You got me, I was sent here by the World Economic Forum to sabotage your 25OHD levels so you will succumb to the 5G radiation.

When I get some time I'll start adding notable D clinical trial failures in this thread to supplement the initial post.
 
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BigTex

Well-Known Member
@TorontoTRT
I am not going to ever spew any anti-supplement propaganda and in fact will be the 1st to tell you supplementing is certainly much better than being deficient. In fact, I teach that very thing in a college level nutrition class. I spend quite a few hours doing my own research so I am fully capable of making up my own mind. I was always taught that intelligent people always question what they have been told. I certainly encourage everyone to do the same. I never question motives rather than hold myself to always being a critical thinker. I have never been a sheep in life. We were told in the 80's that anabolic steroids has no athletics enhancement benefits. That statement was in the pharmaceutical inserts of every box of anabolics you got from the pharmacy. I think 60 years of athletes not buying in, made those statement look kind of foolish.

The interesting thing I have learned with research it is a set of data gathered based on the investigating of a theory which shows the statistics looking at an average of the sample. There are a lot of individual differences simply because we are all different genetically. For instance, we are told cigarettes will kill you, yet uncle Henry smokes 5 packs a day and is 98 years old.

Another problem, many times 1 study get posted out of 100 and it is the only one that shows negative effects. Is it a bad study? Is it all of the sudden gospel? All it means is we need to further investigate, possible look different areas. Why did this study get the results 100 others didn't get? Unless evidence comes from a meta-analysis or randomized clinical trial don't put a whole lot of faith it it. There needs to be more investigations.

Perhaps instead of telling people that post data that it is "silly" you post your on arguments regardless if the are science based, observation based or just expert opinions. This is how people debate and how others can intelligently make up their minds. I come to this board simply because of the level of intelligence I see. Lots of very bright minds here that make me think and investigate. I would hope it stays that way and never degrades in sort of Twitter.
 
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TorontoTRT

Active Member
You got me, I was sent here by the World Economic Forum to sabotage your 25OHD levels so you will succumb to the 5G radiation.
@TorontoTRT
I am not going to ever spew any anti-supplement propaganda and in fact will be the 1st to tell you supplementing is certainly much better than being deficient. In fact, I teach that very thing in a college level nutrition class. I spend quite a few hours doing my own research so I am fully capable of making up my own mind. I was always taught that intelligent people always question what they have been told. I certainly encourage everyone to do the same. I never question motives rather than hold myself to always being a critical thinker. I have never been a sheep in life. We were told in the 80's that anabolic steroids has no athletics enhancement benefits. That statement was in the pharmaceutical inserts of every box of anabolics you got from the pharmacy. I think 60 years of athletes not buying in, made those statement look kind of foolish.

The interesting thing I have learned with research it is a set of data gathered based on the investigating of a theory which shows the statistics looking at an average of the sample. There are a lot of individual differences simply because we are all different genetically. For instance, we are told cigarettes will kill you, yet uncle Henry smokes 5 packs a day and is 98 years old.

Another problem, many times 1 study get posted out of 100 and it is the only one that shows negative effects. Is it a bad study? Is it all of the sudden gospel? All it means is we need to further investigate, possible look different areas. Why did this study get the results 100 others didn't get? Unless evidence comes from a meta-analysis or randomized clinical trial don't put a whole lot of faith it it. There needs to be more investigations.

Perhaps instead of telling people that post data that it is "silly" you post your on arguments regardless if the are science based, observation based or just expert opinions. This is how people debate and how others can intelligently make up their minds.
My reply was for OP not you. Yeah I was a bit harsh on the guy. But accounts less than 1 month old come on here and post these extreme things like this. Pure misinformation telling people to stop taking D3. I don’t even have to post a counter argument for why we should take D3.
 
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