Sauerkraut brands

#2
Anyone have a sauerkraut brand they like that is high in probiotics that hasn’t been destroyed via processing?
Not sure the brand, but I just pick mine up locally at Whole Foods. Any of their brands are going to still have live probiotics in them. Ive been getting the purple sauerkraut lately, due to it having more vitamins and minerals than white sauerkraut. Both are delicious though, imo.
 
#8
Homemade sauerkraut is the best for probiotics, but you have to refrigerate it after it pickles itself in a brine solution. No "brand" sauerkraut with vinegar listed as an ingredient will have probiotics (unless it's refrigerated). My favorite recipe combines two medium shredded beets for each medium head of cabbage to obtain more "purple power" , and provide more moisture to keep the product submerged as it ferments (about 7 days at room temperature).
 
#9
I make my own kefir. It’s a lot more versatile than sauerkraut. I put it in my morning smoothie every day. It’s super easy to make. I haven’t had so much as a cold in four years. Many other digestive benefits but I will spare you the details.
 
#10
I make my own kefir. It’s a lot more versatile than sauerkraut. I put it in my morning smoothie every day. It’s super easy to make. I haven’t had so much as a cold in four years. Many other digestive benefits but I will spare you the details.
What kind of milk do you use to make it? I’m thinking about trying it, but only if I can find raw unpasteurized milk from 100% grassfed cows. Probably have to find a local farmers market I assume.
 
#11
What kind of milk do you use to make it? I’m thinking about trying it, but only if I can find raw unpasteurized milk from 100% grassfed cows
That’s exactly what I use. I’m fortunate to have a great local farmers market where I can buy raw unpasteurized milk from a few different dairies. In a pinch my local Publix sells 100% local grass fed unhomogenized milk. It’s pasteurized but otherwise from the same dairy.
 
#12
That’s exactly what I use. I’m fortunate to have a great local farmers market where I can buy raw unpasteurized milk from a few different dairies. In a pinch my local Publix sells 100% local grass fed unhomogenized milk. It’s pasteurized but otherwise from the same dairy.
Is there a specific video you learned how to make it from? And do u mind if I ask where exactly you buy your kefir grains from?
 
#13
Is there a specific video you learned how to make it from? And do u mind if I ask where exactly you buy your kefir grains from?
I highly recommend getting the kefir starting grains from North Texas Kefir Club. They have a Facebook page. Making kefir couldn’t be easier. You place the grains in a mason jar and add milk. Cover with some paper towel and leave it for 24 hours. Then strain in a plastic colander and repeat. I’ve had the same grains for 4 years. They have videos on their site but it’s a no brainer. Along with not getting sick, I was a chronic user of allergy nasal sprays and I no longer need to use them.
 
#14
I highly recommend getting the kefir starting grains from North Texas Kefir Club. They have a Facebook page. Making kefir couldn’t be easier. You place the grains in a mason jar and add milk. Cover with some paper towel and leave it for 24 hours. Then strain in a plastic colander and repeat. I’ve had the same grains for 4 years. They have videos on their site but it’s a no brainer. Along with not getting sick, I was a chronic user of allergy nasal sprays and I no longer need to use them.
Awesome, thanks for the tips! Once I source some raw milk, I’ll definitely give it a shot.
 
#16
Kraut, is ridiculously easy to make, dirt cheap and really good!

Use clean utensils and clean hands.

You need to chop or shred a bunch of cabbage. a dense medium-large sized head will fill a quart size wide mouth mason jar., can shred with food processor or knife and cutting board. Keep it pretty coarse, not a fine shred

Put it in a large mixing bowl and add a tablespoon of salt (NOT iodized... iodine inhibits fermentation), toss it to mix in the salt.

let it sit an hour or so, then squeeze and mash it by hand. You may want to repeat this step a couple-few times over a couple hours. The salt will cause the cabbage to sweat out the water it holds. You want it to become very wet. Once you have a good amount of juice, pack it into the jar and mash it down well. Best to top the jar off. you want the cabbage completely saturated and essentially covered by the juice, and you don;t want oxygen in there. The fermentation will create CO2 which prevents oxidation.

Put the lid on LOOSELY, and set the jar on a plate to catch runoff. Set it in a room temperature place for at least 3 days. You should see some of the fluid bubble out under the lid.

At 3 days, it is very fresh and tangy, but you can let it keep fermenting it a long while if you choose. Then keep it in the fridge. This kind of fermentation is essentially old world preserving of the vegetable. With the salt, and fermentation it can stay fresh a good while.

You can also add other veggies to the jar. I like fermented beets and carrots in the kraut.
 
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