CDC STANDARDIZED TOTAL TESTOSTERONE AND ESTRADIOL TESTS

madman

Member
How the CDC Clinical Standardization Programs Are Improving Hormone Tests - AACC.org

WHAT PROGRESS HAS CDC MADE WITH STANDARDIZING TOTAL TESTOSTERONE AND ESTRADIOL TESTS?



Since HoSt began in 2010, CDC has had more than 350 participants in 15 countries. Participants have shown measureable improvements for both total testosterone (TT) and estradiol (E2). Specifically, the among-laboratory bias has decreased from 16.5% in 2007 to 2.8% in 2017 for TT and from 54.8% in 2012 to 13.9% in 2017 for E2. Not only has bias improved, but data from proficiency testing programs also show that standardized testosterone assays are more accurate and consistent compared to non-standardized assays.


Recently, CDC CSP also collaborated with the Endocrine Society and PATH to develop reference ranges for testosterone in non-obese men ages 19-39 years old. These reference ranges are now part of an Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline and according to this guideline can be used by laboratory tests standardized to CDC’s criteria.






WHAT ARE THE NEXT STEPS NOW THAT CDC HAS RECEIVED ADDITIONAL FUNDING FROM CONGRESS FOR HARMONIZATION IN 2018?
This is the first time CDC has received dedicated funding from Congress to improve the quality and reliability of diagnostic tests for hormones. With these funds, CDC CSP plan to increase in size and scope through the addition of new programs, such as the Accuracy-based Monitoring Program for routine laboratories, and new biomarkers such as parathyroid hormones, free thyroxine, and free testosterone. CDC CSP will continue to work with stakeholders and participants to reduce calibration bias and individual sample bias in order to enhance patient care and public health.




I and many will be looking forward to the FREE TESTOSTERONE CDC (HoSt) PROGRAM
 
Last edited:

madman

Member
Congress Funds AACC-Led Harmonization Initiative - AACC.org

The $1.3 trillion omnibus spending bill passed by Congress in March will fund efforts to harmonize laboratory tests, the culmination of more than a decade of AACC advocacy efforts. AACC worked closely with Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-Kan.) and other lawmakers, as well as a partnership of 17 clinical associations. The bill provides $2 million to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The agency plans to use the new funding for materials and monitoring that will enable harmonization of tests for free testosterone, thyroid stimulating hormone, and estrogen.







Great news for us going into 2019!:D
 

Systemlord

Member
It would be beneficial to have receptor sensitivity testing rather than only relying on Total T and Free T measurements.
 
Top