What is the latest treatment for diabetes

#2
There is lots of discussion on it, you should try putting it in the search bar above you will faster results with a broad request. People are busy on the weekend, I usually find I can get a lot of info that narrows down who I should be pin pointing for help.
 
#4
As the title, I am a second type diabetes patient, what is the latest treatment for diabetes
I highly recommend to you the book "Diabetes Solution" by Dr. Richard Bernstein, whose protocol represents the cutting edge of diabetes treatment. His belief is that everyone, including diabetics, can and should have normal blood sugars. His regimen is tough, but it works. Also lots of good information on this site.
 
#5
I highly recommend to you the book "Diabetes Solution" by Dr. Richard Bernstein, whose protocol represents the cutting edge of diabetes treatment. His belief is that everyone, including diabetics, can and should have normal blood sugars. His regimen is tough, but it works. Also lots of good information on this site.
Very good info. When you first read Dr. Bernstein's plan you will say no way can I do that, but you may find you can modify things a bit to get the results you need. It is going to come down to diet, exercise, and possibly the addition of some oral agent(metformin). What is your current HbA1c?
 
#7
Very good info. When you first read Dr. Bernstein's plan you will say no way can I do that, but you may find you can modify things a bit to get the results you need. It is going to come down to diet, exercise, and possibly the addition of some oral agent(metformin). What is your current HbA1c?
In Bernstein's view, the goal is to achieve truly normal blood sugars, the same as healthy non-diabetics, i.e., fasting blood sugar in the mid-80s, 100 or below one hour after a meal and fasting blood sugar by two hours. These are the numbers for healthy non-diabetics with truly normal blood sugars no matter what they eat or how much (or how little) they exercise.

If you are a diabetic (or pre-diabetic for that matter), Dr. Bernstein's protocol (highly simplifed) for achieving truly normal blood sugars in a nutshell in order of application is

1. Low-carb diet. Dr. Bernstein 's diet is below 30 grams per day for average-sized adults. If your blood sugar control is only marginally compromised, you might first try below 100 grams per day, then 50, then 30.

2. If insufficient to achieve normal blood sugars, add exercise, both resistance and cardio.

3. If still insufficient, add oral agents. Metformin first and foremost. If that doesn't work, there are others to try.

4. If still insufficient, add insulin.

HgbA1c can be a useful marker to track, but alone is not sufficient to either diagnose diabetes or determine if blood sugar is being managed properly (of note to those on TRT, blood donation will result in HgbA1c lower than might otherwise be expected given one's average blood sugars).

It is primarily high post-meal spikes in blood glucose (over 140), and secondarily fasting blood sugar, that appear to drive diabetic complications and progression of the condition. Diabetics, including Type 1s, who achieve and consistently maintain truly normal blood sugars can avoid complications and live a full life-span.
 
#9
Yep. Dr. Bernstein's plan will work no doubt. He's living proof of that. When a person sees what he recommends regarding carbs after eating like most people do it is quite a shock.
 
#10
Dr. Bernstein's diet plan isn't much different from some of the older bodybuilding diets. My last A1C was at 5.6. My doc doesn't seem too concerned, but I am. I'm going to start cutting carbs more, and see how it goes. Since I weight train, I also ingest whey protein on a daily basis, which will have to stop. I'll sub in powdered egg protein.

I wonder how difficult it will be to keep my calories up, and not turn into a skeleton. I 6'2", about 180lbs.
 
#11
I'm Type 2 as well and have been for years. It took some time but I managed to eliminate all sugar from my diet.. no more soft drinks etc. I eat whole foods and take 1000mg metformin daily. My A1C used to be 6.8 but now I'm down to 5.3. What's important to ascertain is that you truly are a type 2 diabetic. Because most MD's who treat patients are not yet aware of Type 3C diabetes. If you are Type 3C you need to know so you can adjust your protocol effectively. Many people who have type 3C(a new designation) think they are type 2, and so do their MD's.

Here's a good site
http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/
 
#12
Dr. Bernstein's diet plan isn't much different from some of the older bodybuilding diets. My last A1C was at 5.6. My doc doesn't seem too concerned, but I am. I'm going to start cutting carbs more, and see how it goes. Since I weight train, I also ingest whey protein on a daily basis, which will have to stop. I'll sub in powdered egg protein.

I wonder how difficult it will be to keep my calories up, and not turn into a skeleton. I 6'2", about 180lbs.
I think you are right to be concerned if you consistently have an HgbA1c of 5.6%. That equates to an estimated average serum glucose of approximately 115 mg./dl. What is your typical fasting blood sugar upon arising? What are your typical blood sugars at one hour after a large mixed meal? At two hours?

Regarding whey protein, have you tested and seen a rise in your blood sugar after its ingestion? I ask because there are studies indicating that whey protein can reduce post-prandial blood sugars in some patients, but has no effect or raises it in others. In my own case, I have noticed no real effect on blood sugar attributable to whey protein. Before you give it up, you might consider doing N=1 self-testing to see how it actually affects your blood sugar. FWIW, I tried egg protein once as an experiment. It did not dissolve at all well in water and I did not like the taste (also noticed no apparent effect on blood sugar either positive or negative). I went back to whey.
 
#13
I think you are right to be concerned if you consistently have an HgbA1c of 5.6%. That equates to an estimated average serum glucose of approximately 115 mg./dl. What is your typical fasting blood sugar upon arising? What are your typical blood sugars at one hour after a large mixed meal? At two hours?

Regarding whey protein, have you tested and seen a rise in your blood sugar after its ingestion? I ask because there are studies indicating that whey protein can reduce post-prandial blood sugars in some patients, but has no effect or raises it in others. In my own case, I have noticed no real effect on blood sugar attributable to whey protein. Before you give it up, you might consider doing N=1 self-testing to see how it actually affects your blood sugar. FWIW, I tried egg protein once as an experiment. It did not dissolve at all well in water and I did not like the taste (also noticed no apparent effect on blood sugar either positive or negative). I went back to whey.
For me whey protein does raise my insulin levels, after using whey protein for 3 months I had my worst A1c and fasting glucose that I had in years. When I discontinue all my levels my back to good ranges.
 
#14
I'm Type 2 as well and have been for years. It took some time but I managed to eliminate all sugar from my diet.. no more soft drinks etc. I eat whole foods and take 1000mg metformin daily. My A1C used to be 6.8 but now I'm down to 5.3. What's important to ascertain is that you truly are a type 2 diabetic. Because most MD's who treat patients are not yet aware of Type 3C diabetes. If you are Type 3C you need to know so you can adjust your protocol effectively. Many people who have type 3C(a new designation) think they are type 2, and so do their MD's.

Here's a good site
http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/
Some additional background on Type 3C Diabetes. https://www.excelmale.com/showthread.php?12481&p=86210#post86210
 
#15
I think you are right to be concerned if you consistently have an HgbA1c of 5.6%. That equates to an estimated average serum glucose of approximately 115 mg./dl. What is your typical fasting blood sugar upon arising? What are your typical blood sugars at one hour after a large mixed meal? At two hours?

Regarding whey protein, have you tested and seen a rise in your blood sugar after its ingestion? I ask because there are studies indicating that whey protein can reduce post-prandial blood sugars in some patients, but has no effect or raises it in others. In my own case, I have noticed no real effect on blood sugar attributable to whey protein. Before you give it up, you might consider doing N=1 self-testing to see how it actually affects your blood sugar. FWIW, I tried egg protein once as an experiment. It did not dissolve at all well in water and I did not like the taste (also noticed no apparent effect on blood sugar either positive or negative). I went back to whey.


Conclusion of this study

Effects of WP supplementation on glycemia in T2DM depend on the baseline characteristics

- lower body weight, normal triglyceride and lower GLP-1 levels predict glucose lowering

- in contrast obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and high baseline GLP-1 predict increased glucose response

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5530249/
 
#16
In July 2017, I weighed 202lbs. My A1C in April 2017 was 5.8. Anyway, I began a bodybuilding diet July 2017, and dropped my weight down to 178lbs in 6 weeks. No refined carbs, fast food...I did begin taking whey protein on a daily basis and joined a gym where I have been going 5 days a week. So, my current A1C as of April 2018 is 5.6. I'll be seeing a new FNP this upcoming week. I'm firing my current Dr.
From my comp metabolic panel, 2/18:
Glucose...103
Est AVG Glucose...114
 
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