1. #1

    Questions about my TRT regimen and way to help things along

    Hello ExcelMale Forums.

    Ive finally managed to switch to injections. I have risen from 200-something to 957 using clomid. I feel hardly different and I feel it might be because of the fact I was using Clomid, which ive heard it has effect on mood which is the main reason im switching to injections over it.

    My regimen for now is 1ML of Test every 7 days and 0.75 ML of HCG and Arimidex too. Is this a good regimen? How long would it typically take for this regiment to start taking effect?

    Im hoping that things get better from here on. However, I want to know what else can help things along. I consume Zinc and stuff already. Would it be helpful to continue take clomid with this even with mood effects? Or is that not advised.

    Also, I am curious about the benefits of metformin, I took it briefly when younger as I was pre-diabetic. Im fortunate enough to have been given the news of no longer having that condition after rigorous diet and exercise. I never really remembered to take it and I am glad I have overcome the condition naturally. But I have heard its insulin lowering properties can be very helpful for hormone optimization wonder if its worth it to take. I found it here.

    Please let me know what you guys think. Thanks.
    Last edited by CoastWatcher; 06-20-2018 at 04:04 PM.

  2. # ADS
    Purchase From Our Affiliates
    Join Date
    Always
    Posts
    51
    Help Excelmale

    Defy
     

  3. #2
    Member Sean Mosher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    517
    Can you post your labs?
    If you're still not feeling better with these new numbers we need to see what else might be going on.

  4. #3
    1ml of testosterone could be 100mg or 200mg, injecting testosterone once weekly has it's problems. You levels peak and start dropping rapidly leaving you lower at the end of the week, try splitting up your injections two or more times a week to keep levels stable. SHBG labs are recommended as this is a tool for dosing and injection frequencies.

    A full set of labs would provide a good meaningful discussion.

  5. #4
    And what is .75ml of anastrozole? Do you mean .75mg? Taken how often? In response to what estradiol/sensitive value? Labs will sharpen things for all of us.
    I am not a physician. Comments offered here are for discussion purposes only. Please consult your doctor before initiating, changing, or stopping any therapy.

  6. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    27
    Alrighty then, these results are from May 31st
    HEMATOCRIT 46.8 % 37.0 - 49.0 %


    CHOLESTEROL 146 MG/DL <200 MG/DL
    TRIGLYCERIDES 93 MG/DL <150 MG/DL
    HDL CHOLESTEROL 37 MG/DL >39 MG/DL
    LDL CHOLESTEROL CALCULATED 90 MG/DL <100 MG/DL
    LDL/HDL RATIO, SERUM 2.44 RATIO <3.55 RATIO

    SOMATOMEDIN-C 129 NG/ML 94 - 291 NG/ML
    TESTOSTERONE LEVEL 957 NG/DL 300 - 1080 NG/DL
    SEX HORMONE BINDING GLOBULIN 21.2 NMOL/L 16.5 - 55.9 NMOL/L
    CALC FREE TESTOSTERONE 279.9 PG/ML 47.0 - 244.0 PG/ML

    ESTRADIOL LEVEL 34.5 PG/ML <=60.7 PG/ML
    T3 UPTAKE 33.1 % 24.3 - 39.0 %
    THYROXINE BINDING CAPACITY 1.0 0.8 - 1.3
    NOTE: THYROXINE BINDING CAPACITY IS INVERSELY RELATED TO T-UPTAKE,
    DECREASED WITH HYPERTHYROIDISM AND LOW THYROID BINDING GLOBULIN (TBG),
    INCREASED IN HYPOTHYROIDISM OR WITH HIGH TBG.
    T4 TOTAL 4.7 UG/DL 4.5 - 10.5 UG/DL
    FTI 4.7 UG/DL 4.2 - 11.6 UG/DL
    HEMOGLOBIN A1C 5.5 % 4.2 - 5.6 %
    THYROID STIMULATING HORMONE 1.250 UIU/ML 0.400 - 4.100 UIU/ML

  7. #6
    You require more thyroid tests to determine why T4 is so low, it should be midrange and is the total thyroid hormone being produced. Some of these thyroid labs are obsolete and tells me your doctor is a little behind the times, you need Free T3, Free T4, Reverse T3 and antibodies. Free T3 is the only active thyroid hormone, it's the stuff that makes the magic happen, where the rubber meets the road.

    You can tell alot about a doctor by the labs he/she orders and it's easy to predict the level of care you will be receiving. I doubt that's the correct E2 sensitive LC/MS/MS method designed for men. You need to inject at a minimum twice weekly, EOD may help lower estrogen and keep levels even more stable.

  8. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by Systemlord View Post
    You require more thyroid tests to determine why T4 is so low, it should be midrange and is the total thyroid hormone being produced. Some of these thyroid labs are obsolete and tells me your doctor is a little behind the times, you need Free T3, Free T4, Reverse T3 and antibodies. Free T3 is the only active thyroid hormone, it's the stuff that makes the magic happen, where the rubber meets the road.

    You can tell alot about a doctor by the labs he/she orders and it's easy to predict the level of care you will be receiving. I doubt that's the correct E2 sensitive LC/MS/MS method designed for men. You need to inject at a minimum twice weekly, EOD may help lower estrogen and keep levels even more stable.
    I have no idea what those abbreviations mean. I ran the idea of hypothyroidism to my doc and we tested for it here. He said its normal range.

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Vithat View Post
    I have no idea what those abbreviations mean. I ran the idea of hypothyroidism to my doc and we tested for it here. He said its normal range.

    You need to understand the word normal gets thrown around a lot, most doctors have no idea what normal thyroid numbers look like, so they follow these labs ranges which has been thought for some time now to be far too broad as they have people within these ranges clearly experiencing hypothyroid symptoms. So forgive if I don't believe your doctor.

    You show your labs to many different doctors and some will see a problem where others do not. It's called reference range endocrinology and it makes it to where the doctors have no need for critical thinking or reasoning, it ends all decisions simply because you are within the normal ranges. It creates robots who ignore symptoms, "you're in range, you must feel good". It's not that simple.

    EOD is every other day.

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Vithat View Post
    I have no idea what those abbreviations mean. I ran the idea of hypothyroidism to my doc and we tested for it here. He said its normal range.
    It means you didn't get the right tests run to determine your thyroid status. You absolutely need to know where your Free T3 sits - as was noted, it's the essential test for the indispensable hormone. It was nice to run those other tests, somebody made some money as a result, but they don't shed any genuine light on the fundamental question of your thyroid function. They were superseded years ago.

    The LC, MS/MS (that's the methodology) test estradiol is the only one that is appropriate for men. It's known as the sensitive or ultra-sensitive test in common discussion. It wasn't run (the reference range is a dead giveaway).
    I am not a physician. Comments offered here are for discussion purposes only. Please consult your doctor before initiating, changing, or stopping any therapy.

  11. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    27
    Should I go to the same doctor and ask for the test or where can I go to get it done?

    If it is low, what is there to be done that can raise it? What are the benefits of doing so?

  12. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Vithat View Post
    Should I go to the same doctor and ask for the test or where can I go to get it done?

    If it is low, what is there to be done that can raise it? What are the benefits of doing so?
    Am I correct in thinking you're younger, in your 20s?
    I am not a physician. Comments offered here are for discussion purposes only. Please consult your doctor before initiating, changing, or stopping any therapy.

  13. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    27
    Yes, Im 22

  14. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Vithat View Post
    Yes, Im 22
    Your posted labs reflect HgbA1c of 5.5%. That equates to an average blood glucose of approximately 111. That, especially in one so young, is not normal blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association's guidelines (which many feel are across-the-board too high) diagnose pre-diabetes beginning at HgbA1c of 5.7%. Many doctors would say 5.5% is pre-diabetes.

    But don't focus too much on HgbA1c. It is a good measure of relative progress (I have it run every time I pull labs), but only that. Far more important are post-meal blood sugars (1 and 2 hours), followed by fasting blood sugars. The goal is to have truly normal blood sugars, the same as healthy non-diabetics have their entire lives, i.e., fasting blood sugar in the mid-80s, 100 or below one hour after a meal and below 90 or even fasting blood sugar by two hours. These are the numbers for healthy non-diabetics with truly normal blood sugars no matter what they eat or how much (or how little) they exercise.

  15. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by dnfuss View Post
    Your posted labs reflect HgbA1c of 5.5%. That equates to an average blood glucose of approximately 111. That, especially in one so young, is not normal blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association's guidelines (which many feel are across-the-board too high) diagnose pre-diabetes beginning at HgbA1c of 5.7%. Many doctors would say 5.5% is pre-diabetes.

    But don't focus too much on HgbA1c. It is a good measure of relative progress (I have it run every time I pull labs), but only that. Far more important are post-meal blood sugars (1 and 2 hours), followed by fasting blood sugars. The goal is to have truly normal blood sugars, the same as healthy non-diabetics have their entire lives, i.e., fasting blood sugar in the mid-80s, 100 or below one hour after a meal and below 90 or even fasting blood sugar by two hours. These are the numbers for healthy non-diabetics with truly normal blood sugars no matter what they eat or how much (or how little) they exercise.
    Well Im not sure how id measure that or what most of that means. Are you saying theres no way to keep it normal? Additionally, does this mean I would still qualify for Metformin as a medication to treat it?

  16. #15
    Moderator Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    7,765
    Quote Originally Posted by Vithat View Post
    Well Im not sure how id measure that or what most of that means. Are you saying theres no way to keep it normal? Additionally, does this mean I would still qualify for Metformin as a medication to treat it?
    It means stop spiking your insulin, go low-carb.

    I am not a medical practitioner. Any suggestions I provide are not medical recommendations and are just my opinions. Please consult with your physician on any matters concerning your health.

  17. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Vithat View Post
    Well Im not sure how id measure that or what most of that means. Are you saying theres no way to keep it normal? Additionally, does this mean I would still qualify for Metformin as a medication to treat it?
    Sorry for taking so long to reply.

    HgbA1c may, or may not, accurately reflect your actual average blood sugar levels (see https://bit.ly/2to6G0t).

    The definitive test that doctors use to diagnose pre-diabetes and diabetes is an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (see https://mayocl.in/2ltKBJl). But you can do your own testing to get a good idea of what your blood sugars actually are. Get a blood sugar meter and some test strips, no prescription required. The Freedom Freestyle and Freedom Freestyle Lite meters and test strips are highly accurate and recommended. There are many others. Test yourself upon arising and one, two and three hours after meals. Here's is some helpful information on that process: https://bit.ly/2Iixe87

    If the resulting blood sugars are completely normal, congratulations! If blood sugars fall into the category of pre-diabetes (or diabetes), they need to be brought under control. The causes of pre-diabetes are unclear (although inflammation is often involved), and it is true that the majority of pre-diabetics do not progress to diabetes, about 35-40% will do so. But pre-diabetes is not a benign condition. Pre-diabetics, e.g., experience serious cardiovascular events (stroke and heart attacks) at significantly higher rates than those with truly normal blood sugars.

    For solid information about high blood sugars and how to normalize them, I highly recommend the book "Diabetes Solution" by Dr. Richard Bernstein. It explains how everyone, including pre-diabetics and diabetics, can and should have normal blood sugars. The protocol (highly simplified) laid out therein for achieving truly normal blood sugars in a nutshell is as follows (note that each step includes all the previous ones, i.e., if #1 isn’t enough, you add #2, if still not enough you add #3, etc.):

    1. First and foremost, a low-carb diet. No one with blood sugar control issues can achieve truly normal blood sugars without it, no matter what medications they're on. Dr. Bernstein's diet calls for less than 30 grams of carbohydrate per day for average-sized adults. I try to adhere to that, but it is pretty tough and may not be necessary for everyone. If your blood sugar control is only marginally compromised, you might first try below 100 grams per day. If that's not enough, try going down to 50 grams per day, then 30.

    2. If diet alone is insufficient to achieve normal blood sugars, add exercise, both resistance and cardio.

    3. If still insufficient, add oral agents. Metformin first and foremost. If that doesn't work, there are others to try.

    4. If still insufficient, add insulin.

    Good luck.

  18. #17
    Some of this just echos what's already been said, but:

    At least your total and free T numbers look good on paper, and hematocrit isn't high

    But: when was the blood drawn relative to your T injection/dosing schedule?

    -Your SHBG is 21.2 indicating you need more frequent dosing. 1 time per week is terrible with SHBG that low. If it was me I'd start on every other day and possibly move to daily if that doesn;t do the trick. With that SHBG level, you need to monitor Total and Free T , focusing on Free T at trough (Blood taken in the morning before your next dose.) It's critical for lower SHBG to know what Free T levels are.

    -You need to communicate your dosages in mg, mcg and iu, not ML! As already stated testosterone comes in 100mg/ml and 200mg/ml concentrations. HCG can also be mixed at different concentrations.

    -what form of T? the most usual in the US is Testosterone cypionate, but in other countries, other esters are more common.

    -You don't state a dose for anastrazole either, this is very important. And, I am assuming this was prescribed at the onset of your treatment? You should not be taking it to begin with based on your estradiol number which is just fine and is also most likely a falsely high reading due to it being the wrong test. anastrazole should only be considered after being on TRT and re-assessing E2 level, not from the beginning

    -And echo what's been said about thyroid.

    Once again, self education time: please refer to Orrin's list here: https://www.excelmale.com/showthread...250#post111250

    And refer to Nelson's discounted labs list of tests: My post here: https://www.excelmale.com/showthread...911#post110911
    Last edited by Blackhawk; 06-23-2018 at 11:19 AM.

  19. #18
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by Blackhawk View Post
    Some of this just echos what's already been said, but:

    At least your total and free T numbers look good on paper, and hematocrit isn't high

    But: when was the blood drawn relative to your T injection/dosing schedule?

    -Your SHBG is 21.2 indicating you need more frequent dosing. 1 time per week is terrible with SHBG that low. If it was me I'd start on every other day and possibly move to daily if that doesn;t do the trick. With that SHBG level, you need to monitor Total and Free T , focusing on Free T at trough (Blood taken in the morning before your next dose.) It's critical for lower SHBG to know what Free T levels are.

    -You need to communicate your dosages in mg, mcg and iu, not ML! As already stated testosterone comes in 100mg/ml and 200mg/ml concentrations. HCG can also be mixed at different concentrations.

    -what form of T? the most usual in the US is Testosterone cypionate, but in other countries, other esters are more common.

    -You don't state a dose for anastrazole either, this is very important. And, I am assuming this was prescribed at the onset of your treatment? You should not be taking it to begin with based on your estradiol number which is just fine and is also most likely a falsely high reading due to it being the wrong test. anastrazole should only be considered after being on TRT and re-assessing E2 level, not from the beginning

    -And echo what's been said about thyroid.

    Once again, self education time: please refer to Orrin's list here: https://www.excelmale.com/showthread...250#post111250

    And refer to Nelson's discounted labs list of tests: My post here: https://www.excelmale.com/showthread...911#post110911
    This blood was drawn at the end of May as I said.

    As I am just learning on how to inject, I dont know how particularly smart that would be atm. I do not know how to divide up the dose and whatnot for one. And my inexperience injecting might lead to an increased chance of infection or waste.

    Ill have to get back to you on the measurements specifics. I do know its Cypionate and at 200mg/ml concentration.

    This is just a lot information right now. Im trying not to feel overwhelmed.
    Last edited by Vithat; 06-28-2018 at 03:53 PM. Reason: typo

  20. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by dnfuss View Post
    Sorry for taking so long to reply.

    HgbA1c may, or may not, accurately reflect your actual average blood sugar levels (see https://bit.ly/2to6G0t).

    The definitive test that doctors use to diagnose pre-diabetes and diabetes is an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (see https://mayocl.in/2ltKBJl). But you can do your own testing to get a good idea of what your blood sugars actually are. Get a blood sugar meter and some test strips, no prescription required. The Freedom Freestyle and Freedom Freestyle Lite meters and test strips are highly accurate and recommended. There are many others. Test yourself upon arising and one, two and three hours after meals. Here's is some helpful information on that process: https://bit.ly/2Iixe87

    If the resulting blood sugars are completely normal, congratulations! If blood sugars fall into the category of pre-diabetes (or diabetes), they need to be brought under control. The causes of pre-diabetes are unclear (although inflammation is often involved), and it is true that the majority of pre-diabetics do not progress to diabetes, about 35-40% will do so. But pre-diabetes is not a benign condition. Pre-diabetics, e.g., experience serious cardiovascular events (stroke and heart attacks) at significantly higher rates than those with truly normal blood sugars.

    For solid information about high blood sugars and how to normalize them, I highly recommend the book "Diabetes Solution" by Dr. Richard Bernstein. It explains how everyone, including pre-diabetics and diabetics, can and should have normal blood sugars. The protocol (highly simplified) laid out therein for achieving truly normal blood sugars in a nutshell is as follows (note that each step includes all the previous ones, i.e., if #1 isn’t enough, you add #2, if still not enough you add #3, etc.):

    1. First and foremost, a low-carb diet. No one with blood sugar control issues can achieve truly normal blood sugars without it, no matter what medications they're on. Dr. Bernstein's diet calls for less than 30 grams of carbohydrate per day for average-sized adults. I try to adhere to that, but it is pretty tough and may not be necessary for everyone. If your blood sugar control is only marginally compromised, you might first try below 100 grams per day. If that's not enough, try going down to 50 grams per day, then 30.

    2. If diet alone is insufficient to achieve normal blood sugars, add exercise, both resistance and cardio.

    3. If still insufficient, add oral agents. Metformin first and foremost. If that doesn't work, there are others to try.

    4. If still insufficient, add insulin.

    Good luck.
    So the best thing to do is add keto dieting? Again, this is simply a lot to digest. I have contemplated doing a keto and military hybrid diet. Accompanied by intermittent fasting.

  21. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by Blackhawk View Post
    Some of this just echos what's already been said, but:

    At least your total and free T numbers look good on paper, and hematocrit isn't high

    But: when was the blood drawn relative to your T injection/dosing schedule?

    -Your SHBG is 21.2 indicating you need more frequent dosing. 1 time per week is terrible with SHBG that low. If it was me I'd start on every other day and possibly move to daily if that doesn;t do the trick. With that SHBG level, you need to monitor Total and Free T , focusing on Free T at trough (Blood taken in the morning before your next dose.) It's critical for lower SHBG to know what Free T levels are.

    -You need to communicate your dosages in mg, mcg and iu, not ML! As already stated testosterone comes in 100mg/ml and 200mg/ml concentrations. HCG can also be mixed at different concentrations.

    -what form of T? the most usual in the US is Testosterone cypionate, but in other countries, other esters are more common.

    -You don't state a dose for anastrazole either, this is very important. And, I am assuming this was prescribed at the onset of your treatment? You should not be taking it to begin with based on your estradiol number which is just fine and is also most likely a falsely high reading due to it being the wrong test. anastrazole should only be considered after being on TRT and re-assessing E2 level, not from the beginning

    -And echo what's been said about thyroid.

    Once again, self education time: please refer to Orrin's list here: https://www.excelmale.com/showthread...250#post111250

    And refer to Nelson's discounted labs list of tests: My post here: https://www.excelmale.com/showthread...911#post110911

    I have the exact numbers now. Anastrozole is 1mg tablet once a week. It was prescribed at the beginning of my treatment when I was taking Clomid.

    Not very good at math. So the answer the internet gave me concerning my injection of 1ML of test cypionate every week is 1000 mg it told me.

    Im trying to find an endocrinologist that works better for me (dont like the one im currently with) so I can get the test done about thyorid and pre-diabetes.

  22. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Vithat View Post
    I have the exact numbers now. Anastrozole is 1mg tablet once a week. It was prescribed at the beginning of my treatment when I was taking Clomid.

    Not very good at math. So the answer the internet gave me concerning my injection of 1ML of test cypionate every week is 1000 mg it told me.

    Im trying to find an endocrinologist that works better for me (dont like the one im currently with) so I can get the test done about thyorid and pre-diabetes.
    I can assure you, you aren't injecting 1000mg of testosterone every week. So...look at the vial. It should tell you XXXmg/ml.

    Your anastrozole dose is a larger one than is normally seen.
    I am not a physician. Comments offered here are for discussion purposes only. Please consult your doctor before initiating, changing, or stopping any therapy.

  23. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by CoastWatcher View Post
    I can assure you, you aren't injecting 1000mg of testosterone every week. So...look at the vial. It should tell you XXXmg/ml.

    Your anastrozole dose is a larger one than is normally seen.

    Ooooh why didnt you say so. It says 200mg/ml

    As for HCG it says 12000 IU

    What does it mean?

  24. #23
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    27
    Is there anything bad that can happen on a high Anastrozole dose?

  25. #24
    I do not mean any disrespect here when I say this but TRT is a life long therapy. You should try to get much more educated and knowledgeable on the subject, especially on what the dosage units mean on your prescritions to ensure you are taking the proper dose.


    As far as your question "Is there anything bad that can happen on a high Anastrozole dose?" - Only if you want to feel absolutely miserable and hate getting out of bed. You want to avoid taking too high a dose of anastrozole or any aromatase inhibitor.

  26. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Vithat View Post
    Is there anything bad that can happen on a high Anastrozole dose?
    Anastrozole suppresses estradiol levels. As MarkM notes, too much is a ticket to hormone hell. It is primarily used as an adjunctive therapy for women undergoing treatment for breast cancer who, on a temporary basis, need to eliminate estradiol. It works well for men who aromatize testosterone at such a level as to impede their TRT protocol; they need to manage their e2 level. But estradiol is a necessary hormone for men, it's not a waste product. Eliminate it and you impact sexual function, cognition, a whole host of things. It's a good drug for men on TRT, IF THEY NEED IT.
    Last edited by CoastWatcher; 07-03-2018 at 03:29 PM.
    I am not a physician. Comments offered here are for discussion purposes only. Please consult your doctor before initiating, changing, or stopping any therapy.

  27. #26
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkM View Post
    I do not mean any disrespect here when I say this but TRT is a life long therapy. You should try to get much more educated and knowledgeable on the subject, especially on what the dosage units mean on your prescritions to ensure you are taking the proper dose.


    As far as your question "Is there anything bad that can happen on a high Anastrozole dose?" - Only if you want to feel absolutely miserable and hate getting out of bed. You want to avoid taking too high a dose of anastrozole or any aromatase inhibitor.
    Im trying. I am easily overwhelmed with the information to sift through. Im just coming off of rehab and therapy for depression and am trying to figure a lot of things out.

    So far ive gathered that I need to get my Thyroid checked properly as well as insulin resistance. I need to follow a ketogenic or low carb diet coupled with trying to lose weight which should mitigate insulin resistance, or try and get back on Metformin. I need to talk to my test doctor about the anastrozole and how it might be affecting me. I also need to figure out how to divvy up my 1ML of Test and 0.75 ML of HCG to every other day since I apparently need to up my injection frequency.

    Thats everything everyone here has said. Is that the gist of it?

  28. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Vithat View Post
    This blood was drawn at the end of May as I said.

    This is not relevant to my comment about having blood drawn at trough. The trough is when you blood T level is at its lowest right before your next dose. So if you are injecting say on Monday morning 1x/ week, you should be having blood drawn early Monday morning, before you take your injection.


    Quote Originally Posted by Vithat View Post
    As I am just learning on how to inject, I dont know how particularly smart that would be atm. I do not know how to divide up the dose and whatnot for one. And my inexperience injecting might lead to an increased chance of infection or waste.

    Good you have this self knowledge, but you HAVE to learn this. As stated, 1 dose per week is usually problematic and this is pretty much assured for someone with your SHBG. Your dosage frequency depends entirely on you SHBG level. You HAVE to study this and understand it. One 200mg dose per week is not appropriate for you.


    Quote Originally Posted by Vithat View Post
    This is just a lot information right now. Im trying not to feel overwhelmed.

    Yes, it is a lot of information and can take time to learn and understand. You NEED to do so! There are numerous red flags that your doctor does not know what he/she is doing in terms of your treatment. You have to take responsibility for yourself in this regard. No one else will do it for you.


    Quote Originally Posted by Vithat View Post
    Ill have to get back to you on the measurements specifics. I do know its Cypionate and at 200mg/ml concentration.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vithat View Post
    Not very good at math. So the answer the internet gave me concerning my injection of 1ML of test cypionate every week is 1000 mg it told me.



    These two statements entirely contradict each other. If your T cypionate is 200mg per ML then 1 ml equals 200mg, NOT 1000mg.


    If you are injecting 1ml per week of 200mg/mg solution you are getting a single dose of 200mg per week.


    This is a high dose and this level very commonly causes problems: High estradiol and hematocrit being the main ones,. Reasonable initial dose is usually 100mg per week to 150mg per week divided into number of doses based on SHBG. The lower the SHBG the more frequent the dosing.


    Quote Originally Posted by Vithat View Post
    Im trying to find an endocrinologist that works better for me (dont like the one im currently with) so I can get the test done about thyorid and pre-diabetes.

    This is good. You should leave that doctor. Again, there are many red flags in your treatment indicating your doctor has no clue how to manage your TRT. Unfortunately it is very rare for an endocrinologist to have this knowledge. The traditional standards of endocrinology are seriously outdated, and old treatment protocols often do more harm than good. You need a specialist who actually understands up to date TRT issues. Finding that person can be a huge challenge.

  29. #28
    I know it can be overwhelming and we only wish to help. I've tried to make sense of this entire thread and you have been given some good advice. You do need to talk to your doctor about the anastrozole dose. If it were me, I would not take it anymore until you feel like you have symptoms of your estradiol skyrocketing. If you feel like you must take some I would not take more than 1/4 of the 1 mg pill until you speak with your doctor. You need o make sure that you have the right estradiol test. The right one is called Estradiol Sensitive and it is the "LC/MS/MS" assay. Your doctor should know what that is.


    For the testosterone injections I can only assume you are supposed to be taking 100 mg a week. No way it is 1,000 mg a week. I would take 50 mg twice a week and split the week in half. So take the injections every 3.5 days. For example, I take mine Monday morning and Thursday evening. If you are using a 1 cc or 1 ml syringe (cc and ml is the same thing) then fill the syringe up to 0.25 since your testosterone is 200 mg/ml. Since your script is 200 mg/ml this will give you 50 mg of testosterone. If you do not have a 0.25 on the barrel of the syringe then just fill the syringe right in the middle of the 0.20 and 0.30 to get 0.25.



    Since you are so young I would take the HCG but not 500 iu each day. You should clarify with your doctor but until such time I would just take 500 iu twice a week (the same day as your testosterone injection). If you are using the same type syringe, 1cc or 1 ml, then feel the syringe up to the 0.50.


    You were smart to join the forum for help and to become more knowledgeable about your TRT protocol. These are just recommendations on my part and I am not an expert. I'm sure others more knowledgeable will weigh in to help further.
    Last edited by MarkM; 07-03-2018 at 03:42 PM.

  30. #29
    MarkM has given you a good, calm overview of where you stand and how to orient yourself so as to begin moving ahead. It is a shame that so few doctors don't understand the ins and outs of male hormone management. It means that the patient has to become his own advocate. But that isn't entirely a bad thing. It is our body, our health, our life; when our body breaks down its up to us to educate ourselves and step up.

    Read ad the material in your thread. Spend some time reading the other threads, particularly the "sticky" threads in each folder. You can get a solid understanding of this issue and claim your rights as a patient.
    I am not a physician. Comments offered here are for discussion purposes only. Please consult your doctor before initiating, changing, or stopping any therapy.

  31. #30
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkM View Post
    I know it can be overwhelming and we only wish to help. I've tried to make sense of this entire thread and you have been given some good advice. You do need to talk to your doctor about the anastrozole dose. If it were me, I would not take it anymore until you feel like you have symptoms of your estradiol skyrocketing. If you feel like you must take some I would not take more than 1/4 of the 1 mg pill until you speak with your doctor. You need o make sure that you have the right estradiol test. The right one is called Estradiol Sensitive and it is the "LC/MS/MS" assay. Your doctor should know what that is.


    For the testosterone injections I can only assume you are supposed to be taking 100 mg a week. No way it is 1,000 mg a week. I would take 50 mg twice a week and split the week in half. So take the injections every 3.5 days. For example, I take mine Monday morning and Thursday evening. If you are using a 1 cc or 1 ml syringe (cc and ml is the same thing) then fill the syringe up to 0.25 since your testosterone is 200 mg/ml. Since your script is 200 mg/ml this will give you 50 mg of testosterone. If you do not have a 0.25 on the barrel of the syringe then just fill the syringe right in the middle of the 0.20 and 0.30 to get 0.25.



    Since you are so young I would take the HCG but not 500 iu each day. You should clarify with your doctor but until such time I would just take 500 iu twice a week (the same day as your testosterone injection). If you are using the same type syringe, 1cc or 1 ml, then feel the syringe up to the 0.50.


    You were smart to join the forum for help and to become more knowledgeable about your TRT protocol. These are just recommendations on my part and I am not an expert. I'm sure others more knowledgeable will weigh in to help further.
    Thank you for your reassuring response. Im goig to try my best to cut through all this information.

    Concerning diet. Ive been trying to get that down for a while now. Right now Im hopping between diet to diet. Currently im doing a military diet (VERY small portions. Such as only 1 egg one slice of toast, one apple) Im not sure its worth it. Im combining it with intermittent fasting as well.

    How difficult is it to stick to a Keto diet? Additionally, would a carnivore diet be even better if little to no carbs can provide such benefit?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Pregnenolone... considering adding to TRT regimen...
    By BillyJ03z in forum Thyroid, DHEA, Cortisol, Prolactin, Pregnenolone and More
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-06-2018, 01:05 PM
  2. Can adding Clomid to a TRT regimen raise estradiol?
    By JamesAxe in forum Testosterone Basics & Questions
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-20-2018, 04:59 PM
  3. TRT /Hcg Regimen - Is This Reasonable?
    By Kb29247 in forum Prevent & Reverse Side Effects (HCG, Anastrozole, etc)
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-22-2017, 06:53 PM
  4. Supplement Regimen and TRT
    By skaman007 in forum Nutrition and Supplements
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-12-2017, 03:50 PM
  5. New to Forum with some questions on TRT regimen.
    By DDD in forum Testosterone Basics & Questions
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 12-27-2015, 11:16 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •