NAC Benefits: HDL and More

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
Thread starter #1
nac.jpg

NAC does not cause rash or flushing as Niacin. Men on high doses of testosterone have low HDL.

Pharmacol Res. 1993 Oct-Nov;28(3):213-8.
Dose-related increase of HDL-cholesterol levels after N-acetylcysteine in man.
Franceschini G, Werba JP, Safa O, Gikalov I, Sirtori CR.
Source
Centre E. Grossi Paoletti, University of Milano, Italy.
Abstract

Changes in plasma lipid-lipoprotein levels were evaluated in 10 hyperlipidemic patients during treatment with progressive doses (from 1200 mg day-1 to 3600 mg day-1) of N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, as well as those of lipoprotein (a) did not change to an appreciable extent, even with the highest dosage. However, the HDL-cholesterol levels showed a significant, dose-related rise, the mean absolute increase, with the highest NAC dose, being of approximately 10 mg dl-1 (16.2%). The rise of HDL-cholesterol was independent of changes in other lipid-lipoprotein parameters, suggesting a possible direct effect of NAC on the HDL system.


http://www.amazon.com/Jarrow-Formul..._2?ie=UTF8&qid=1381299756&sr=8-2&keywords=nac
 
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#2
N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) is an antioxidant that is used as a prescription drug and as a dietary supplement. As a drug, it is given orally to treat acetaminophen overdose. The inhalant and oral solution forms have a mucolytic effect to relieve obstructions in bronchial diseases and in tracheotomy procedures. The oral capsule is marketed as a dietary supplement for its liver protective function and is popular among patients with AIDS and cancer. Clinical studies show NAC can treat drug-induced hepatotoxicity, prevent and treat conditions of oxidative stress and reduced GSH levels caused by diseases such as HIV/AIDS and cancer, and alleviate toxicity from chemo- and radiotherapy. Results for treatment of chronic lung disease with NAC are mixed. NAC reduces the number of acute exacerbations in patients with chronic bronchopulmonary disease and significantly improves lung function and endurance in COPD patients after exercise, but these effects were not observed in other trials. NAC has no significant benefits in patients with cystic fibrosis or with Lou Gehrig's disease. NAC has glutamate modulating effect and has been tested as a treatment for psychiatric disorders including addictions and substance abuses. It also reduced symptoms of trichotillomania. Studies in smokers and patients with a history of adenomatous colonic polyps show NAC inhibits cancer biomarker development, although it did not inhibit the formation of secondary head and neck or lung tumors. One study suggests oral NAC can help reduce chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. NAC is generally safe, but gastrointestinal side effects have been reported. Due to its antioxidant activity, it may interfere with the actions of some chemotherapy drugs. ++
 
#4
NAC is a staple for me. 600mg daily is a must. Outstanding compound with a tremendous host of benefits. It's also used in liver transplant patients.
 
#5
I really like to use NAC all year long with some other compounds ( polycosanol, vit b5 , grape seed extrct, ..) in a supplement called : Cycle Assist. That really helps keep my blood lipids in order.
 
#6
View attachment 211

NAC does not cause rash or flushing as Niacin. Men on high doses of testosterone have low HDL.

Pharmacol Res. 1993 Oct-Nov;28(3):213-8.
Dose-related increase of HDL-cholesterol levels after N-acetylcysteine in man.
Franceschini G, Werba JP, Safa O, Gikalov I, Sirtori CR.
Source
Centre E. Grossi Paoletti, University of Milano, Italy.
Abstract

Changes in plasma lipid-lipoprotein levels were evaluated in 10 hyperlipidemic patients during treatment with progressive doses (from 1200 mg day-1 to 3600 mg day-1) of N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, as well as those of lipoprotein (a) did not change to an appreciable extent, even with the highest dosage. However, the HDL-cholesterol levels showed a significant, dose-related rise, the mean absolute increase, with the highest NAC dose, being of approximately 10 mg dl-1 (16.2%). The rise of HDL-cholesterol was independent of changes in other lipid-lipoprotein parameters, suggesting a possible direct effect of NAC on the HDL system.


http://www.amazon.com/Jarrow-Formul..._2?ie=UTF8&qid=1381299756&sr=8-2&keywords=nac
Nelson, I just came across this study from 2007 regarding the potential negative effects of NAC on the heart:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/81503.php

Your thoughts?
 

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
Thread starter #7
This study was done in mice and they used a dose 40 times higher than that used in humans. We have studied NAC in HIV with observed immune benefits.
 
#8
Pulmonary hypertension

Nelson, I just came across this study from 2007 regarding the potential negative effects of NAC on the heart:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/81503.php

Your thoughts?
Chiming in here. The original article that this piece refers to may be found here:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1952618/pdf/JCI0729444.pdf
The concern is whether taking NAC can contribute to pulmonary hypertension. A number of issues make me a bit dubious. Aside from the fact that this is a stuy in mice, the dose they used of 10 mg/ml is much higher than a dose humans would use. The next question would be the degree to which NAC is converted into the SNOAC form that might increase risk, if it happens at all.

In another mouse study (
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21103380 ), gender differences suggested female mice were protected from pulmonary hypertension using NAC.

In general, studies have shown that NAC is protective in various lung diseases and conditions (fat embolism, cystic fibrosis). Conditions like COPD can benefit from NAC ( http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24293993 ). However, only larger, longer term studies would be able to detect a particular risk of PH from the use of NAC. My best guess is the risk is negligible.
 
#11
I will try it as my LDL is high. I have no idea why either, as I do not eat sweets and I eat very few carbs overall. I just had a cholesterol test so now is a good time to start. I will take these and test again in 30 days.
 

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
Thread starter #14
This is what Jarrow claims on their NAC Sustain:

N-A-C Sustain is a bilayer quick release/sustained release N-A-C formulation. One third of the N-A-C releases rapidly and two thirds releases slowly over time. This raises blood levels quickly while also sustaining them.* N-A-C SUSTAIN releases in the small intestine over a longer period, which greatly assists in N-A-C antioxidant effect beyond the typical biological half-life (1. 5 hours) of N-A-C in the bloodstream.
 

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
Thread starter #15
More on NAC



Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2013 Mar;34(3):167-77. doi: 10.1016/j.tips.2013.01.001. Epub 2013 Jan 29.
The promise of N-acetylcysteine in neuropsychiatry.Berk M1, Malhi GS, Gray LJ, Dean OM.


Abstract
N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) targets a diverse array of factors germane to the pathophysiology of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders including glutamatergic transmission, the antioxidant glutathione, neurotrophins, apoptosis, mitochondrial function, and inflammatory pathways. This review summarises the areas where the mechanisms of action of NAC overlap with known pathophysiological elements, and offers a précis of current literature regarding the use of NAC in disorders including cocaine, cannabis, and smoking addictions, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, autism, compulsive and grooming disorders, schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder. There are positive trials of NAC in all these disorders, and although many of these require replication and are methodologically preliminary, this makes it one of the most promising drug candidates in neuropsychiatric disorders. The efficacy pattern of NAC interestingly shows little respect for the current diagnostic systems. Its benign tolerability profile, its action on multiple operative pathways, and the emergence of positive trial data make it an important target to investigate.




Full Paper: http://ponderapharma.com/wp-content...se-of-N-acetylcysteine-in-neuropsychiatry.pdf
 
#19
Let me know if you try it. Get lipids measured a month after starting Citrus Bergamont at 1500 mg per day and NAC at 1200 mg per day.
I'll be the lab rat experiment for this and I will follow through and post the lab numbers here. I should be getting my baseline labs done next week. I'll order these and start the day after getting first lab test, then when I get a follow on lab, I'll share those results. I hope these help. We'll find out.

i have stubborn low HDL which seems to be a "genetic gift" and also high triglycerides I'm on prescription Niacin and Trilipix. I'm also taking an ungodly amount of high concentrate fish oil. Nothing has helped the HDL at all. Zero. Niacin seems to be doing nothing. The Trilipix is keeping my triglycerides stable at the high normal range.

Last year I did do a virgin coconut oil experiment and that was a total disaster -- it raised my LDL a LOT and dropped my HDL several points.

My Dr says "just keep taking your medications and stop worrying about your HDL". My last year HDL check was 29, so yes, I am concerned with that no matter what my Dr says.
 
#20
I'm first going to do an experiment with NAC to see if that has any effect on my low levels of HDL. Below are my starting lab measures before starting to take NAC:

labtest.jpg

I'll post updated results in about 3 months.
 
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