Higher Magnesium Intake Is Associated with Lower Fasting Glucose and Insulin

Thread starter #1
Higher Magnesium Intake Is Associated with Lower Fasting Glucose and Insulin, with No Evidence of Interaction with Select Genetic Loci, in a Meta-Analysis of 15 CHARGE Consortium Studies

Magnesium is an essential mineral found in many foods; rich sources include whole grains, green leafy vegetables, coffee, and legumes. Magnesium is a critical cofactor in >300 enzymatic reactions, including those related to energy metabolism (1). Evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal observational studies suggests that diets higher in magnesium are associated with reduced risk of insulin resistance (28) and type 2 diabetes (9, 10), whereas in intervention studies, supplemental magnesium improves measures of glucose and insulin metabolism in generally healthy adults (11, 12), as well as in those with insulin resistance (13, 14) and type 2 diabetes (15, 16). However, little is known about potential interaction between magnesium intake and genetic variability on glycemic traits, in which genetic variants related to either magnesium transport and homeostasis or glucose and insulin metabolism may modify the pathways through which magnesium exerts its effects.
http://jn.nutrition.org/content/143/3/345.full
 

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
#2
Just be careful with doses that can cause loose stools. Also, magnesium supplements can interfere with the absorption of certain medications.

From WebMD:

MAGNESIUM INTERACTIONS What is this?

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

Antibiotics (Aminoglycoside antibiotics) interacts with MAGNESIUM
Some antibiotics can affect the muscles. These antibiotics are called aminoglycosides. Magnesium can also affect the muscles. Taking these antibiotics and getting a magnesium shot might cause muscle problems.
Some aminoglycoside antibiotics include amikacin (Amikin), gentamicin (Garamycin), kanamycin (Kantrex), streptomycin, tobramycin (Nebcin), and others.

Antibiotics (Quinolone antibiotics) interacts with MAGNESIUM
Magnesium might decrease how much antibiotic the body absorbs. Taking magnesium along with some antibiotics might decrease the effectiveness of some antibiotics. To avoid this interaction take these antibiotics at least 2 hours before, or 4 to 6 hours after, magnesium supplements.
Some of these antibiotics that might interact with magnesium include ciprofloxacin (Cipro), enoxacin (Penetrex), norfloxacin (Chibroxin, Noroxin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), trovafloxacin (Trovan), and grepafloxacin (Raxar).

Antibiotics (Tetracycline antibiotics) interacts with MAGNESIUM
Magnesium can attach to tetracyclines in the stomach. This decreases the amount of tetracyclines that the body can absorb. Taking magnesium along with tetracyclines might decrease the effectiveness of tetracyclines. To avoid this interaction take calcium 2 hours before or 4 hours after taking tetracyclines.
Some tetracyclines include demeclocycline (Declomycin), minocycline (Minocin), and tetracycline (Achromycin).

Bisphosphonates interacts with MAGNESIUM
Magnesium can decrease how much bisphosphate the body absorbs. Taking magnesium along with bisphosphates can decrease the effectiveness of bisphosphate. To avoid this interaction take bisphosphonate at least two hours before magnesium or later in the day.
Some bisphosphonates include alendronate (Fosamax), etidronate (Didronel), risedronate (Actonel), tiludronate (Skelid), and others.

Medications for high blood pressure (Calcium channel blockers) interacts with MAGNESIUM
Magnesium might decrease blood pressure. Taking magnesium with medication for high blood pressure might cause your blood pressure to go too low.
Some medications for high blood pressure include nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan), diltiazem (Cardizem), isradipine (DynaCirc), felodipine (Plendil), amlodipine (Norvasc), and others.

Muscle relaxants interacts with MAGNESIUM
Magnesium seems to help relax muscles. Taking magnesium along with muscle relaxants can increase the risk of side effects of muscle relaxants.
Some muscle relaxants include carisoprodol (Soma), pipecuronium (Arduan), orphenadrine (Banflex, Disipal), cyclobenzaprine, gallamine (Flaxedil), atracurium (Tracrium), pancuronium (Pavulon), succinylcholine (Anectine), and others.

Water pills (Potassium-sparing diuretics) interacts with MAGNESIUM
Some "water pills" can increase magnesium levels in the body. Taking some "water pills" along with magnesium might cause too much magnesium to be in the body.
Some "water pills" that increase magnesium in the body include amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), and triamterene (Dyrenium).
 
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