Ferritin really takes this long to increase?

Dwayne337

New Member
I took thorne's ferrasorb 3 pills spread throughout the day (108mg/day iron) for 2 weeks. Retested and only got a 3 point increase being at the low end of the range, so basically it didn't do anything.

Is this a bad supplement problem or does it really take that long for ferritin to increase? 108mg/day of iron is a lot. Switching to Blood Builder now.
 

Anonymon

Member
I took thorne's ferrasorb 3 pills spread throughout the day (108mg/day iron) for 2 weeks. Retested and only got a 3 point increase being at the low end of the range, so basically it didn't do anything.

Is this a bad supplement problem or does it really take that long for ferritin to increase? 108mg/day of iron is a lot. Switching to Blood Builder now.
In my experience, if you have low ferritin to begin with, it’s often from absorption issues or general things other people wouldn’t have to worry about when considering taking an iron supplement. I’ve taken that amount or more of other brands and I got like 15-20 points in 4-6 months time. Basically useless.

Currently following the advice of another member here and trying ferritts iron at 2x a day with vitamin C and L-Lysine, my additions being a nightly dose a B vitamin and iron liquid, and in my case I’m also eating beef and beef liver daily with vitamin C and L-Lysine as well each time. I’ve also found that, in my case, MCT oil seems to increase absorption of ‘something’, which studies document in rats on iron, and have been having that with things too. Also found a study showing that higher dose iron in the short term within a week did increase ferritin a lot faster than the usual amounts people take, which stopped 4-6 days after they stopped taking more of the very same iron supplements others were taking. The control on normal iron supplement amounts saw no improvement in that span of time.

I’m still having issues after 3-4 days of this but I will say that my skin and hair are looking less hypothyroidy within that span of time in a way that is improving day over day. I’ve taken straight T3 before and NDT and just T4, which usually make me look and feel less hypothyroidy at first until I deplete myself of something, then I’m worse off and can’t recover until I stop the meds. With my current iron regime, I’m looking progressively like I do when I first start a thyroid supplement before it goes bad for me. It’s promising.

I have gut issues and have also been on BPC-157 at 250iu’s 2x a day with 2ius of HGH to help with that, which settles it down very quickly, but has never produced the results I’m seeing so far. Fingers crossed, but I have never personally had the progress I’m making from anything else but my current iron regime.

Too much iron isn’t good for you but if you’re authentically low and having issues, more in the short term, done strategically, does increase ferritin faster according to at least one study. You might also want to lower your TRT dose a little while starting this because test uses up iron faster.

I admit right now I am taking a metric crap ton of iron in through dietary sources and pills, but hey, it’s seemingly working. My skin’s less puffy each day by a little, and my hair hasn’t looked this hydrated in a while. I won’t do this forever but until I refill my stores, I’ve had nothing but positive experiences with it.

If you haven’t had success so far, I’d at least try the ferrits with C and L-Lysine 2x a day, and try C and L-Lysine alongside daily beef and/or liver. At least for a bit. I’m not the only one that’s seen success with this when other things failed.
 

madman

Super Moderator
I took thorne's ferrasorb 3 pills spread throughout the day (108mg/day iron) for 2 weeks. Retested and only got a 3 point increase being at the low end of the range, so basically it didn't do anything.

Is this a bad supplement problem or does it really take that long for ferritin to increase? 108mg/day of iron is a lot. Switching to Blood Builder now.

Oral iron therapy (supplementation) can take anywhere from 2-3 months or longer in some cases.

When oral iron therapy fails intravenous infusions may be needed.




Parenteral iron

Intravenous infusion results in a rapid replenishment of iron stores with peak ferritin concentrations at 7–9 days after infusion.
In our experience, the hemoglobin should rise within 2–3 weeks in the majority of patients





GETTING YOUR IRON THROUGH IV INJECTION

Getting more iron by eating iron-rich foods and taking an oral iron supplement are effective ways to treat iron deficiency, and while this is the preferred method of iron therapy, there are certain circumstances where intravenous (IV) iron may be necessary. IV iron therapy is beneficial when iron supplements are unsatisfactory or impossible, such as dialysis-associated anemia related to chronic kidney disease. The British Columbia Ministry of Health Guidelines and Protocols state that oral iron supplementation (compared to IV iron therapy) is safer, more cost-effective, and convenient.


WHAT IS INTRAVENOUS IRON?

IV iron, a parenteral therapy, is iron administered via injection into a vein. Each infusion usually takes 3 or 4 hours and, depending on the type of iron, can be given in one infusion or spread out over a few weeks until the patient’s iron level is corrected.
Your doctor will explain the frequency of injections required based on your situation.

Just to give you an idea about the cost of IV iron therapy, the British Columbia Ministry of Health Guidelines and Protocols estimate the approximate medical cost for adults to be $290 – $375 per month (plus facility costs).

Before starting IV iron therapy, a small dose may be administered to observe the patient in case of an allergic reaction. If all goes well, then the dose is increased over the next few hours.


WHO NEEDS IT?

Although oral iron supplementation is the preferred method of therapy, IV iron therapy may be beneficial for patients experiencing inadequate iron absorption, continued blood loss, or who cannot tolerate oral iron tablets or liquids. Also, patients who are required to take an erythropoietin-stimulating agent (ESA) may also require IV iron.
Given by injection, ESAs are utilized to increase red blood cell production (which increases iron needs); IV iron may be needed to ensure that the body has a sufficient supply of iron (ESAs actually depletes iron stores, which means that if there is not enough iron in the body to begin with, ESAs will be ineffective).

Patients with the following conditions may require IV iron:

  • Acute severe gastrointestinal bleeding
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis)
  • Chronic kidney disease (on dialysis)
  • Cancer patients (with anemia and taking an ESA)
  • Severe menorrhagia (abnormally heavy or prolonged menstrual periods)
  • Surgically induced malabsorption syndromes (gastric bypass)


post #23

Results/Conclusion:

- compared with participants who did not receive iron supplementation, those who received iron supplementation had shortened time to 80% hemoglobin recovery in both the low-ferritin and higher-ferritin groups

- recovery of iron stores in all participants who received supplements took a median of 76 days (IQR, 20-126); for participants not taking iron, median recovery time was longer than 168 days (IQR, 147->168 days; P < .001)

- without iron supplements, 67% of participants did not recover iron stores by 168 days

- among blood donors with normal hemoglobin levels, low-dose iron supplementation, compared with no supplementation, reduced time to 80% recovery of the post-donation decrease in hemoglobin concentration in donors with low ferritin (< 26 ng/ml) or higher ferritin (>26 ng/ml)
 
Yes, it takes months to get ferritin levels up. Be sure to check your vitamin D levels too. Most people in the population have low vitamin D as it's mostly absorbed via the sun, which most of us don't get much of. Vitamin D is essential for the absorption of all minerals, including iron. Note it can also take months to improve Vitamin D levels if they are very low. Don't guess at this. Get your vitamin D levels checked. One more tip when supplementing with iron. It can make you constipated. Take 500mg magnesium daily while taking an iron supplement and it should help. And if you are donating blood to control hematocrit levels, you will need to stop donations at least until you get your iron levels back to normal. If hematocrit is too high during this time then cut your TRT dosing down.
 

Systemlord

Member
When I was iron deficient I was also vitamin C deficient and you need vitamin C to be able to absorb iron.

I was able to get my ferritin up to 128 in less than 3 months on only vitamin C because now I was able to absorb iron from my diet.

So make sure you have adequate amounts of vitamin C in your diet.
 

Match

Member
E quem tem Ferritina alta, mas ao mesmo tempo Hematócrito quase no limite mínimo ??
Ferro Sérico 107 ug / dl (59-158)
Hamatocrito 40 (40-53)
Ferritina 519 (30-325)
???
 

Online statistics

Members online
15
Guests online
6
Total visitors
21

Latest posts

Top