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Guided_by_Voices

Active Member
A few comments on your first post:

  • I would definitely try a trial of Clomid before full TRT. It worked well for me for several years before I went on TRT. I have not heard of consistent success with enclomifene.
  • I went through a somewhat similar process as you regarding fat loss and it is very similar to the theorists who talk about a “set point” where the body tries to defend a particular fat level. Below are some things that seemed to help me for your consideration.
  • Frequent small meals seem to work better for many people. I know the arguments against this, but the bottom line is that it is worth trying. It seems to work well for me and I seem to be leaner when I am eating that way.
  • Longer fasts rather than just time restricted feeding can be very effective and break a fat loss barrier. Fasting for 3-5 days seems to be much more effective than cutting calories or daily fasts
  • I would read-up on micro-biome health as there is growing evidence that the gut bacteria have a big influence on how many calories are absorbed. Listen to Joel Greene’s podcasts with Ben Greenfield for example on this topic.
  • While I am a huge believer in low carb for many people, there are some people who do better on a more balanced diet as long as the carbs are not excessive and you may be one of those people. You might also try a sensible carnivore diet for a while.
  • Make your “cardio” HIIT training. In the words of Mark Sisson, “make your short, hard workouts shorter and harder and your long, easy workouts longer and easier.”
  • Regarding soft tissue injuries, there’s a lot that can be said here but try avoiding max-effort lifts and increase the volume of your overall work. I find that something like 8 sets of 2 at 90% works well for the big lifts.
  • Above all, keep experimenting to see what will eventually work
 
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Guided_by_Voices

Active Member
Also, 5 workouts a week screams overtraining which screams Cortisol, and elevated cortisol is well-known to promote fat-retention. I would cut back to no more than three and replace the others with some walking until you are seeing fat-loss. Also, one of the reasons I am on TRT, and clomid before that, is that there is no way I could sustain my workout/activity schedule without becoming over-trained before I had a mechanism to keep my hormones up.
 

sammmy

Active Member
Here is my advice based on my own experience. I am 48yo male, lean when I follow my rules, and become skinny fat when I break them - I am a sugar addict.

1. Walk continuously 1-1.5 hours a day (7000 - 1000 steps counted by phone) in a nice nature area. Weight training does not burn a lot of calories, walking does.

2. Drink a cup of green tea, at breakfast and lunch. It increases metabolism and makes you feel more satisfied for longer periods without food. I use sugar substitute sucralose with the tea.

3. Protein shake in the afternoon if you feel hunger.

4. Do not eat refined sugar or sugary fruits. Sugar stimulates appetite and leads to eating more food and sugar. I use a sugar substitute sucralose instead.

5. Do not eat refined sugar and any sugar substitute at dinner - both will make you crave even more food, creating a viscious cycle. Eat bland foods at dinner: eggs, bread, beans, lentils, eggs, soups, chicken, tomatoes. Get a sufficient amount of calories in the dinner so that you do not feel hungry hours later - you cannot fool the body with 300 calories at dinner.

Just want to clarify that the combo green tea with red ginseng is WAY more stimulating than plain green tea. Apparently green tea is synergistic with red ginseng. May affect sleep negatively.

Benner sells Green Tea with Lemon and Ginseng that I highly recommend, can be found at Aldi stores for dirt cheap:

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bleedy

New Member
RMR: ~ 1500
TDEE: 2500

If I consume >1800kcals/day, I will put on both LBM and BF regardless of training.
I'm already @ 55% fats. Fats being the most calorie dense macro @ 9g/kcal, I will balloon up even more. I think the problem is that hormone output is not optimized. For example, my TSH is in the 4s despite taking thyroid replacement.

You might be right about the protein intake. My BUN is consistently elevated and my fasting glucose is always high despite being low carb. Excess protein = gluconeogenesis = higher glucose readings.
Some times we can't see the forest through the trees. My two cents:

If TDEE is 2500Kcals/day then I don't understand how anyone could not lose weight consuming 1800Kcals/day.

Most people, myself included, seriously underestimate their calories consumed. If I'm trying to lose weight, I have to be strict with my food scale and cronometer use regardless of the type of diet I'm trying. Without tracking, I reliably overeat over time even though I'm convinced that I'm not.

On the calorie expenditure side, I wear a Fitbit and it wildly overstates calories burned. For instance walking a mile will burn on average about 100 calories but my Fitbit will report 200+. As a result, I use the Fitbit as a relative measure of my calorie expenditure only, not to track TDEE.

I say all this to suggest that before you dive down too many rabbit holes or spend tons of $$, maybe you should adopt a hyper strict way of tracking the calories you consume, if only for a month or two. Also your TDEE may be overstated (?) A TDEE of 2500 while consuming 1800 that doesn't lead to weight loss is not logical.

Best of luck and hopefully this didn't offend.
 

bleedy

New Member
RMR: ~ 1500
TDEE: 2500

If I consume >1800kcals/day, I will put on both LBM and BF regardless of training.
I'm already @ 55% fats. Fats being the most calorie dense macro @ 9g/kcal, I will balloon up even more. I think the problem is that hormone output is not optimized. For example, my TSH is in the 4s despite taking thyroid replacement.

You might be right about the protein intake. My BUN is consistently elevated and my fasting glucose is always high despite being low carb. Excess protein = gluconeogenesis = higher glucose readings.
Some times we can't see the forest through the trees. My two cents:

If TDEE is 2500Kcals/day then I don't understand how anyone could not lose weight consuming 1800Kcals/day.

Most people, myself included, seriously underestimate their calories consumed. If I'm trying to lose weight, I have to be strict with my food scale and cronometer use regardless of the type of diet I'm trying. Without tracking, I reliably overeat over time even though I'm convinced that I'm not.

On the calorie expenditure side, I wear a Fitbit and it wildly overstates calories burned. For instance walking a mile will burn on average about 100 calories but my Fitbit will report 200+. As a result, I use the Fitbit as a relative measure of my calorie expenditure only, not to track TDEE.

I say all this to suggest that before you dive down too many rabbit holes or spend tons of $$, maybe you should adopt a hyper strict way of tracking the calories you consume, if only for a month or two. Also your TDEE may be overstated (?) A TDEE of 2500 while consuming 1800 that doesn't lead to weight loss is not logical.

Best of luck and hopefully this didn't offend.
 
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