ExcelMale.com
    • You have probably reached our site in your search for health and potency. Are you wondering who to trust with men’s health information in an online world full of scammers and deception? Well, you are in the right place!

      Welcome to ExcelMale.com, one of the largest and best moderated men’s health forums on the Internet focused on increasing health, potency and productivity in men. With over 13,000 members (as of April 2016) that include educated men, physicians, pharmacists, dietitians, exercise trainers, nutritional supplement experts, and other professionals in the field, ExcelMale is fast becoming a leader in the field. Our forum topics range from testosterone replacement therapy, Trimix injections use for ED, HCG use for better fertility and libido, estradiol management, thyroid function optimization, peptide information, exercise routines, best supplements for men, high protein diets, testosterone side effect management and much more. We also provide men’s health information via Interviews with experts, Videos, and webinars. Last but not least, our members share their reviews of hormone replacement clinics and doctors, compounding pharmacies, pharmaceutical products, supplements, and much more. Our great moderators review every post daily to detect spammers or abuse, so ExcelMale is a safe environment for all men. And since every man wants to help important women in their lives, we do not neglect female health information as we include a folder called “ExcelFemale” to post the latest on HRT in women.


      Search our content by typing your question here.

      Register here to join our community! Don’t be shy, ask questions by posting in any forum folder. We can help each other to regain our best selves!.


      Wishing you the greatest health,

      Nelson Vergel

      Founder


    • Exposure to Phthalates Decreases Testosterone and Sperm Quality in Men




      Phthalates are used in a large variety of products, from enteric coatings of pharmaceutical tablets and nutritional supplements to viscosity control agents, gelling agents, film formers, stabilizers,dispersants, lubricants, binders, emulsifying agents, and suspending agents. End-applications include adhesives and glues, electronics, agricultural adjuvants, building materials, personal-care products, medical devices, detergents and surfactants, packaging, children's toys, modeling clay, waxes, paints, printing inks and coatings, pharmaceuticals, food products, and textiles.


      Phthalates are easily released into the environment because there is no covalent bond between the phthalates and plastics in which they are mixed. As plastics age and break down, the release of phthalates accelerates. People are commonly exposed to phthalates, and most Americans tested by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have metabolites of multiple phthalates in their urine. Because phthalate plasticizers are not chemically bound to PVC, they can easily leach and evaporate into food or the atmosphere. Phthalate exposure can be through direct use or by indirect means through leaching and general environmental contamination. Diet is believed to be the main source of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and other phthalates in the general population. Fatty foods such as milk, butter, and meats are a major source.



      Reprod Toxicol. 2013 Oct 15. pii: S0890-6238(13)00356-0. doi: 10.1016/j.reprotox.2013.10.001. [Epub ahead of print]

      Human urinary phthalate metabolites level and main semen parameters, sperm chromatin structure, sperm aneuploidy and reproductive hormones.

      Jurewicz J, Hanke W, Radwan M, Sobala W, Ligocka D, Radwan P, Bochenek M, Hawuła W, Jakubowski L.

      Source

      Department of Environmental Epidemiology; Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland (address: 8 Teresy St; 91-362 Lodz, Poland). Electronic address: joannaj@imp.lodz.pl.

      Abstract

      The aim of the study was to assess the association of phthalate metabolites levels in urine with semen parameters (sperm concentration, motility, morphology, CASA parameters), sperm chromatin structure, sperm aneuploidy and reproductive hormones. The study population consisted of 269 men who were attending an infertility clinic and had normal semen concentration (20-300 mln/ml) or slight oligozoospermia (15-20 mln/ml). Participants were interviewed and provided a semen sample. The phthalate metabolites were analysed in the urine using a procedure based on the LC-MS/MS method. Urinary phthalate metabolites levels were significantly associated with a decrease in sperm motility (5OH MEHP, MEHP, MINP), CASA parameters (MBP), testosterone level (MEHP) and an increase sperm DNA damage (MBP) and sperm aneuploidy (MBzP, MBP, MEHP, MEP). In view of the importance of human reproductive health and the widespread usage of phthalates, it is important to further investigate these correlations.

      This article was originally published in forum thread: Exposure to Phthalates Decreases Testosterone and Sperm Quality in Men
      Comments 3 Comments
      1. Nelson Vergel's Avatar
        Nelson Vergel -
        J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Aug 14:jc20142555. [Epub ahead of print]

        Urinary Phthalate Metabolites Are Associated With Decreased Serum Testosterone in Men, Women, and Children From NHANES 2011-2012.

        Meeker JD1, Ferguson KK.

        Abstract

        Context: There is evidence of declining trends in T levels among men in recent decades, as well as trends in related conditions at multiple life stages and in both sexes. There is also animal and limited human evidence that exposure to phthalates, chemicals found in plastics and personal care products, is associated with reduced androgen levels and associated disorders. Objective: To explore relationships between urinary concentrations of 13 phthalate metabolites and serum total T levels among men, women, and children when adjusting for important confounders and stratifying by sex and age (6-12, 12-20, 20-40, 40-60, and 60-80 y). Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011-2012. Patients or Other Participants: US general population.

        Interventions: None Main Outcome

        Measures: Serum total T measured by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Multiple phthalates were associated with significantly reduced T in both sexes and in differing age groups. In females, the strongest and most consistent inverse relationships were found among women ages 40-60 years. In boys 6-12 years old, an interquartile range increase in metabolites of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate was associated with a 29% (95% confidence interval, 6, 47) reduction in T. In adult men, the only significant or suggestive inverse associations between phthalates (metabolites of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate and dibutyl phthalate) and T were observed among men ages 40-60 years.

        Conclusions: Because T plays an important role in all life stages for both sexes, future efforts should focus on better defining these relationships and their broader impacts.
      1. Nelson Vergel's Avatar
        Nelson Vergel -
        Urinary bisphenol-A, phthalate metabolites and body composition in US adults, NHANES 1999-2006.

        Corbasson I, et al. Int J Environ Health Res. 2016 Oct-Dec.

        Authors
        Corbasson I1, Hankinson SE1, Stanek EJ 3rd1, Reeves KW1.
        Author information
        1a Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology , University of Massachusetts Amherst , Amherst , MA , USA.
        Citation
        Int J Environ Health Res. 2016 Oct-Dec;26(5-6):606-17. doi: 10.1080/09603123.2016.1233524. Epub 2016 Sep 19.

        Abstract

        BACKGROUND: Exposure to bisphenol-A (BPA) and phthalates is highly prevalent. Prior studies have not assessed associations between urinary levels of BPA and phthalate metabolites and body composition.

        METHODS: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data from 1999 to 2006 on adults aged ≥20 were analyzed by linear regression for associations between urinary BPA, monoethyl phthalate, monobutyl phthalate (MBP), monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), and monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP) and lean mass, fat mass, and percent body fat.

        RESULTS: BPA and phthalate metabolites were not independently associated with fat mass or percent body fat. Significant inverse associations were observed with lean mass, with the strongest association observed for BPA in men (mean lean mass 1.39 kg lower for quartile 4 vs. quartile 1, p trend = 0.02).

        CONCLUSIONS: BPA and some phthalates could have important, negative effects on muscle and may affect conditions related to deficits in lean mass, though additional research is needed.