Supplemental alcohol needed to increase hdl ?

DragonBits

Active Member
Thread starter #1
I think I will need to drink at least 5 oz of wine a day to increase HDL cholesterol by 10%.

This seems like a good way to raise my HDL, the only downside I see is 5 oz of wine is ~133 calories. I have read this can also increase my insulin sensitivity, but on the other hand is a source of carbs. Maybe 3 grams, not horrible.

I usually have 1 or at most 2 beers on Saturday, that is not enough to help with HDL.

Daily, I could have one or two of the following.

12 ounces of regular beer, which is usually about 5% alcohol
5 ounces of wine, which is typically about 12% alcohol
1.5 ounces of distilled spirits, which is about 40% alcohol

Ethanol content of these drinks are 0.6 fl oz or 14 grams of pure alcohol.

I like wine, beer with a meal, margaritas. I think Margaritas are more calories and carbs, maybe 160 calories 7g of carbs. I could go with a shot of brandy over ice. Two normal beers are likely too many calories, and I would rather drink less liquid than 12 oz or 2x12 oz..

Anyone try medicinal alcohol to increase heart health and HDL? What did you use, what are the results, any doctors recommending this?
 
#2
Lol, I like where this is going! I have a drink just about every day. Usually a bourbon or an Irish whiskey. I never considered that it might be good for my physical health. I already knew it was good for my mental health.
 

DragonBits

Active Member
Thread starter #3
Lol, I like where this is going! I have a drink just about every day. Usually a bourbon or an Irish whiskey. I never considered that it might be good for my physical health. I already knew it was good for my mental health.
You aren't suppose to enjoy this, it's a purely medicinal debate !
 

Nelson Vergel

Founder, ExcelMale.com
#4
Love my silver tequila. Yes, there is data that links moderate (not excessive) ethanol intake and higher HDL. As we know, higher dose TRT causes low HDL.
 

DragonBits

Active Member
Thread starter #5
Love my silver tequila. Yes, there is data that links moderate (not excessive) ethanol intake and higher HDL. As we know, higher dose TRT causes low HDL.
So what is your hdl, do you think tequila helped increase it?

BTW, I don't know for sure if I can keep drinking 5 oz of wine later at night. (5oz isn't much.) Like 30-60 mins before bed. The first 4 nights I drank the wine, I had disturbed sleep. I had been sleeping very well the previous 2 weeks.

Nothing bothers me, stomach, bowel, nausea, etc about taking meds EXCEPT my sleep. My sleep tends to be very sensitive to many things. I will have to try sans wine a couple of nights to see what happens. Since my sleep tends to be impacted very easily, it could be nearly anything. I always fall asleep easily, but tend wake up often for no apparent reason.
 
#6
I’m a nurse, and once had this patient that was a 104 year old lady. I asked her what her secret was. She didn’t eat healthy or exercise ever she said. She said the one thing she did do everyday without exception though was have happy hour from 2-4pm with her girlfriends everyday. She said they drank a little and smoked a few cigarettes. Not sure what her HDL was, but looks like there might be something to having a drink everyday.

Also, people in the four original Blue Zones drink alcohol moderately and regularly, according to google.
 
#7
My FIL is 86 and healthy as a horse. He eats whatever he wants and really doesn’t exercise per se. He has a drink every night before dinner and has been doing so to 50 years.
 

DragonBits

Active Member
Thread starter #8
I could likely have a drink at dinner, it should me all metabolized by the time I went to sleep.

But when I looked up how long it takes to metabolize alcohol, I ran into some weird facts. I knew women and East Asians were more sensitive to alcohol, I didn't know why. I hear so often not to mix alcohol with painkillers, it's hard to avoid that info. But I didn't know about cayenne peppers and diet soda. I suppose cialis would work the same way?

And typically I would mix rum with a diet coke, so that can make you drunk quicker, and if you are eating blazin hot buffalo wild wings, and I do like spicy food, then it won't take much alcohol to make you feel it.

================================================
East Asians and American Indians: Most individuals use a form of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase called ALD2 to metabolize the acetaldehyde which results from alcohol metabolism. However, many East Asians and American Indians produce a form of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase called ALD2*2 which is far less efficient at breaking down acetaldehyde than ALD2. ALD2*2 is only about 8% as efficient as ALD2 at metabolizing acetaldehyde.

Older Males: As men age they tend to produce less alcohol dehydrogenase. Older men are likely to become more intoxicated on smaller amounts of alcohol than younger men. Alcohol dehydrogenase in women is apparently not affected by age.


Diet Soda: Diet soda interacts with alcohol too, so people who drink mixed drinks made with diet soda will become intoxicated more quickly and achieve higher BACS than people drinking identical drinks made with regular soda. Researchers in Adelaide, Australia found that the stomach emptied into the small intestine in 21.1 minutes for the people who drank mixed drinks made with diet soda. When people drank drinks made with regular soda, the stomach emptied in 36.3 minutes (P < .01). Peak blood alcohol concentration was 0.053 g% for the diet drinks and 0.034 g% with the regular drinks.

Beware Mixing Alcohol with Your Medications
The HAMS web site has a complete listing of alcohol-medication interactions here:
Alcohol-related Drug Interactions
You should check this reference if you have any concerns about the interaction of a medication which you are taking with alcohol. Just for a quick reference we will note here some very common Over The Counter (OTC) and prescriptions medications and a few other substances which you should be very cautious about mixing with alcohol. Some of them may surprise you.

Aspirin: For some reason we are not quite sure of aspirin appears to block the action of alcohol dehydrogenase. What this means is that if you take aspirin before drinking you will became much more intoxicated on a much smaller dose of alcohol than usual. It is generally recommended that you do not take aspirin for around six hours before drinking alcohol. If you have taken aspirin before drinking be cautious and try to limit your alcohol intake as much as possible.

Cayenne pepper: Cayenne pepper dilates the blood vessels and apparently leads higher BACs and more exposure of the brain to alcohol. In short if you drink alcohol while ingesting a lot of cayenne pepper you will become much drunker than usual. Avoid red pepper vodka!

Tylenol (acetaminophen, paracetamol): Even by itself Tylenol can cause liver failure. Combining Tylenol with alcohol is a horrible one two punch to the liver. If you love your liver then don't take Tylenol or Tylenol PM or anything else containing acetaminophen with alcohol or when you are hungover. Else you might as well fry up your liver with onions!!

Ambien: mixing alcohol with ambien is just about a sure recipe for a blackout or a brownout. People who mix the two also often report sleepwalking or even sleep eating. Best to take one or the other and not mix them together.

Narcotic painkillers: Another recipe for blackout and disturbed behavior. Avoid mixing alcohol with Percocet, percodan, vicodin, oxycontin, codeine, morphine or any other narcotic pain killers.

How Alcohol Is Metabolized in the Human Body
 
#11
I eat 3 whole eggs everyday. A well known health doctor on YouTube, Dr. Berg, eats 4 whole eggs everyday, and has been doing so for 20 years he said. His cholesterol levels are perfect from what he says.
I try to eat six whole eggs everyday, I don't always but I try.
 
Thread starter #13
Update:

Pretty interesting, my HDL went from 36 >55. (now I know why so many on the forum have high HDL)

55 is the highest it's ever been.

I guess 5-6 oz of wine a night really does work. BTW, it could be any alcohol, it was just that I got a case of wine for $3.5 per bottle, pretty cheap.

I could get some grain alcohol and add a shot to my diet coke.

Never said I was a connoisseur of wine / alcohol.
 
#14
My lipid profile drawn in February was great, I generally have a small glass of whiskey or a beer nearly every night. It’s something I really enjoy and never gave the potential positive or negative issues a second thought.
 
Thread starter #15
My lipid profile drawn in February was great, I generally have a small glass of whiskey or a beer nearly every night. It’s something I really enjoy and never gave the potential positive or negative issues a second thought.
The fact that they seldom recommend alcohol to raise HDL is both bizarre and strongly paternalistic.

I have read eating fish, exercising, changing your diet can raise HDL by 5%.

5 oz of wine a night increased my HDL by 52%.
 
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