Muscle and weight

Thread starter #1
I've been lifting for 14 months now. I'm not obese but overweight with a belly.
What I want to in now is. Can I be gaining muscle that I currently do not see and that is why I'm losing weight? In other words I don't think I've really gained much muscle if any but I know I've lost because clothes fit better. Is there such thing as not seeing muscle gain yet loose weight?
 
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#2
You can lose fat and gain muscle at the same time but you will generally gain weight when adding muscle because it is heavier than fat. When I started working out again about 4 years ago I lost 3 inches in my waist but only lost 2 lbs. I shed a lot of fat and added a great deal of lean muscle. Body fat dropped from 19% down to 10%. My pants were too big and my shirts too tight.

If your clothes are fitting better that is a positive. Your diet, type of workouts, how often you are working out, ability to sleep well, protein intake, and ............all play a role in weight loss, firming up, and putting on additional lean muscle mass.

We have some folks on the forum that can really guide you on this better than I. I just know what worked for me.
 
Thread starter #3
You can lose fat and gain muscle at the same time but you will generally gain weight when adding muscle because it is heavier than fat. When I started working out again about 4 years ago I lost 3 inches in my waist but only lost 2 lbs. I shed a lot of fat and added a great deal of lean muscle. Body fat dropped from 19% down to 10%. My pants were too big and my shirts too tight.

If your clothes are fitting better that is a positive. Your diet, type of workouts, how often you are working out, ability to sleep well, protein intake, and ............all play a role in weight loss, firming up, and putting on additional lean muscle mass.

We have some folks on the forum that can really guide you on this better than I. I just know what worked for me.
Thanks. For me my clothes fit better like I mentioned but the scale is usually 167 to 170 back and forth since the beginning and I've been lifting for 14 months. Am I suppose to weigh more if I'm gaining muscle?
 
#4
I've been lifting for 14 months now. I'm not obese but overweight with a belly.
What I want to in now is. Can I be gaining muscle that I currently do not see and that is why I'm losing weight? In other words I don't think I've really gained much muscle if any but I know I've lost because clothes fit better. Is there such thing as not seeing muscle grain yet loose weight?
Any weight loss is result of a calorie deficit whereas building muscle and strength is the result of a calorie surplus. Being in a deficit you'll never put on muscle no matter what you do (or take). Muscle is absolutely obscured by a layer of fat but I don't see that in your limited information.
 
#5
No idea if you're even doing anything to actually gain muscle. Most of the males at my gym are going thru the motions, poorly, and using the little silver dumbells on the girls end of the dumbbell rack and making themselves the star of a gym shame video on YouTube. No offense just trying to say there's a huge question of what you're actually doing, or not doing.
 
Thread starter #6
No idea if you're even doing anything to actually gain muscle. Most of the males at my gym are going thru the motions, poorly, and using the little silver dumbells on the girls end of the dumbbell rack and making themselves the star of a gym shame video on YouTube. No offense just trying to say there's a huge question of what you're actually doing, or not doing.
None taken. I lift at home. Nothing fancy as far as equipment. I bench 100 lbs 4 sets and use 20 pound dumbbells for curls and the bench bar for arms too. With the bar I curl usually 40 lbs. I do legs and shoulders too. I'm 45 and have bad shoulders so the up the weight more and more is a struggle for me.
 
Thread starter #11
People have said I have lost weight but my BMI is still the same or increased some.
Is there such thing as losing weight yet the BMI stays the same?
 
#12
I think BMI is a poor measurement overall and out dated. It does not take muscle mass into consideration. Most people with good muscle mass have a BMI that says they are obese. I have 12% body fat and pretty good muscle definition. BMI says that I am borderline obese. I am not anywhere near obese.

So yes, you can lose fat and increase muscle mass and your BMI will go up. The BMI calculation only takes into account our height and our weight, nothing else.
 
#13
Agreed. BMI says I am overweight/borderline. Even my doctor said ignore BMI. Whatsup, do you have access to a body fat test? My only advice keep working out - cardio and lifting, and eat less, with more protein/whole grains/veggies and less sugar and processed grains. From your posts it sound like you are headed in the right direction.
 
#14
None taken. I lift at home. Nothing fancy as far as equipment. I bench 100 lbs 4 sets and use 20 pound dumbbells for curls and the bench bar for arms too. With the bar I curl usually 40 lbs. I do legs and shoulders too. I'm 45 and have bad shoulders so the up the weight more and more is a struggle for me.
You have a lot of room for improvement with these numbers. You may want to try bands, something I am a big advocate for. Bands eliminate the bad shoulders argument. I had 3 rotator tears and began using bands only for upper body 3 years ago. Work as hard as you can, and be sure not to fool yourself. I work out solo at home and think it’s the best way if you are self motivated. No ride to the gym, waiting for equipment, no excuses to miss a workout. Until you get the discipline you should write down every workout and add comments, keeping a training diary. Stick to a program for a minimum of 6 weeks so you are not program hopping. Get adequate rest and recovery. This is a process, not an event and is a long term lifestyle/project. Don’t over think this. Just keep plugging away. You’ll get there with consistency.
 
Thread starter #15
I think BMI is a poor measurement overall and out dated. It does not take muscle mass into consideration. Most people with good muscle mass have a BMI that says they are obese. I have 12% body fat and pretty good muscle definition. BMI says that I am borderline obese. I am not anywhere near obese.

So yes, you can lose fat and increase muscle mass and your BMI will go up. The BMI calculation only takes into account our height and our weight, nothing else.
I see what you mean. The handheld BMI device says I have 26 % or so at my real settings with weight, height and age yet when I added a different height, weight and age as a test it came up completely different. It really measures nothing. People might as well go off a BMI chart because that is all it is.
 
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