Low E2 and 1/2 Life & Frequent Urination

Thread starter #1
I was wondering if you guys notice that low E2 can cause frequent urination like high E2 can? Also, assume for a minute that your high on E2, and you can't run and get a blood test since your traveling. Will E2 drop on its own, assuming that you lower your dosing, or skip an HCG injection. I'm just curious how long it takes for E2 to fall on it's own. I read somewhere that E2's half life was 50 hours. But, that doesn't make sense to me so I thought I would ask you guys.

Thanks for the help!

Thom
 
#2
You have the up and down, how pronounced it is can be guy specific and then likewise dependent on dose and frequency. E does fall back, you know that E follows T in that regard. I'm unfamiliar with this half-life of E that your talking about but would fall back to a point prior to your injection however long that is.
 
Thread starter #3
Thank you for your response. This is the point I was referring to.
"Estradiol is metabolized mostly in the liver, 85% with an elimination half-life of 50 hours and a terminal elimination half-life of 2 days. Plasma concentrations reach steady state levels at about 7 days of once daily treatment."
 
#5
Thank you for your response. This is the point I was referring to.
"Estradiol is metabolized mostly in the liver, 85% with an elimination half-life of 50 hours and a terminal elimination half-life of 2 days. Plasma concentrations reach steady state levels at about 7 days of once daily treatment."
You're referring to someone using Estrogen, NOT the E that is produced in your body thru Aromatase
 
Thread starter #6
Thanks for the response. How does that relate in a practical sense of days or points, or can it? l'm trying to understand how E2 falls. If I got the results of my E2 sen test, and it stated that my score was 60, and I felt my best at 30, how would I get to 30? Do I guess at the correct Anastrozole dose, or do I lower HCG or T in hopes of E2 falling "near" the 30 level?

As an example, I know that Anastrozole has a half life of about 48-50 hours or two days. If I took .25mg of Anastrozole in two days I would have a blood level of .125mg Anastrozole. I only raise the question because when I decide to go to the lab it goes something like this. I know I'm feeling poorly, and I somehow I got myself out of balance. Realistically, it will take 2-3 days to get on the Lab Corp calendar, and about 7 days for the results.This is a total of 9-10 day to see where I was 10 days ago. As you know things have certainly changed, so although helpful not really great since we're 10 days behind the curve. So as you can see I got to thinking not always a wise decision but, it would be great if there was some correlation to help get out meds dialed in.

Perhaps I'm just trying to place logic on top of madness???

Your thoughts?
 
#7
Yes it is some trial and error. You could be best served first by reducing your Testosterone dose such that it is not over the lab range when tested in the trough. if E2 sens test along with symptoms still indicate high, then you can perhaps reduce HCG use and retest. In the end you may introduce an AI at a small dose and keep repeating this little process over time until you get something that you can live with.
 
Thread starter #8
Yes those are our tools. However, my goal was to reduce some of the guessing since you can literally never get where you want to be, by just guessing all the time. Testing is all well and good but, as I say you 10 days late on knowing where you are and you have changed in those ten days. Thank you for your time and response.
 
#9
Yes those are our tools. However, my goal was to reduce some of the guessing since you can literally never get where you want to be, by just guessing all the time. Testing is all well and good but, as I say you 10 days late on knowing where you are and you have changed in those ten days. Thank you for your time and response.
If an algorithm existed that could be used to determine dosing levels, all of us - patients and doctors - would turn to it with confidence and eliminate much of the stress and frustration associated with the balancing of elements in the TRT follies. But the very best doctors practicing in this area, those who really know how the game is played, will frankly admit that they work with TRT patients to solve an unwieldy equation consisting of variables that refuse to be easily sorted out.

Start with patient's subjective response - what he says and how he describes his situation (always the most critical variable); combine it with the objective response - lab tests; assess the pharmacology involved - drugs/dose/frequency. It now becomes a judgment call reflecting clinical experience.

The overarching rule that my doctor follows is that time and patience are required. Four to six weeks, prerably six, before any change can be fairly evaluated as serum levels are in flux. One change at a time (in some cases, two, but never more than that). It can, indeed be maddening, days after day, to let time factor the adjustments made, but we've yet to find a better way.
 
#10
[QUOTE="Thomtst2010, post: 138096, member: 38326" Testing is all well and good but, as I say you 10 days late on knowing where you are and you have changed in those ten days. Thank you for your time and response.[/QUOTE]

Which is moot...you should be on a steady protocol with any possible changes coming after you have lab results. There should be no change in the landscape from blood draw to lab results unless you're intentionally not complying with your dose and schedule.

You don't seem to want to understand how this works.
 
Top